Roethlisberger: Focused on winning, not contract

Roethlisberger: Focused on winning, not contract

As other signal-callers around the league take turns signing record-setting extensions, Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger said he is far more concerned with winning than being next in line to break the bank.

"I care about record-breaking Super Bowl wins and things like that,"

Roethlisberger: Focused on winning, not contract

As other signal-callers around the league take turns signing record-setting extensions, Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger said he is far more concerned with winning than being next in line to break the bank.

“I care about record-breaking Super Bowl wins and things like that,” Roethlisberger, who has been to three Super Bowls and won two, told ESPN on Sunday. “That’s more important to me.”

At age 36 and with two years remaining on his deal, Roethlisberger’s extension might not be a pressing concern yet for the Steelers, who rarely address any contracts more than a year before they are set to expire. His current contract — which, when signed in 2015, made him the second-highest paid quarterback in the league at $21.85 million annually, behind only Aaron Rodgers ($22 million) — was signed as he was entering the final year of his previous deal.

Likewise, Roethlisberger doesn’t see his next deal as an urgent issue.

“I have two years on my contract. I’m not going to be one to sit here and worry about my contract,” he said, per ESPN. “That’s not my job. My job is to play football. I’ll let my representation, the Steelers worry about all that stuff. To me, it’s all about going out and playing now.

“I think there are a lot more, maybe a lot more important people who need to get their deals done now. For me to do it two years out, if it doesn’t make sense for the team, I’m not going to sit here and worry about it.”

Roethlisberger added that he is cognizant of the benefits of being paid less than top-of-the-market value, particularly in how that money can go to teammates and yield a stronger team. He specifically named a pair of his offensive linemen, both of whom have two years remaining on their deals.

“It’s important, too, to understand as quarterback of this team, sometimes you almost have to leave a little bit of money behind for other guys,” Roethlisberger said. “…I know in two years, [Maurkice] Pouncey, [Marcus] Gilbert, there are other very important guys up that I hope get taken care of. Because if they aren’t here, I’m not here. That’s the way it is — they are that good.”

Roethlisberger’s annual salary now ranks 12th among quarterbacks, while his cap hit of $23.2 million ranks ninth. He will make $17 million between base salary and roster bonus this season, with the same figures (and same cap hit) on the books for 2019.

–Field Level Media

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Brady: ‘End coming, sooner rather than later’

Brady: 'End coming, sooner rather than later'

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady said he intends to play football "as long as I'm still loving it," but added he sees his retirement getting closer, in an interview with Oprah Winfrey that aired Sunday.

"I think about it more now than

Brady: ‘End coming, sooner rather than later’

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady said he intends to play football “as long as I’m still loving it,” but added he sees his retirement getting closer, in an interview with Oprah Winfrey that aired Sunday.

“I think about it more now than I used to,” Brady said. “I think I’m seeing that there’s definitely an end coming, sooner rather than later.”

After Winfrey asked if that would mean age 43 or age 45, Brady, who turns 41 in August, said, “As long as I’m still loving it.”

“As long as I’m loving the training and preparation and willing to make the commitment,” he continued. “But it’s also — I think what I’ve alluded to a lot in the [“Tom vs. Time”] docuseries was there’s other things happening in my life too.

“I do have kids that I love, and I don’t want to be a dad that’s not there driving my kids to their games. I think my kids have brought a great perspective in my life, because kids just want the attention. You better be there and be available to them, or else they’re going to look back on their life and go, ‘Dad didn’t really care that much.'”

Brady has an 8-year-old son and 5-year-old daughter with his wife, Gisele Bundchen, as well as a 10-year-old son with actress Bridget Moynihan.

Among other topics covered in the interview was Brady’s relationship with Patriots head coach Bill Belichick, which has been the subject of reports over the last six months suggesting there is friction between the two.

When asked if there is “something going on” between he and Belichick, Brady replied, “Umm, no.”

“I mean, I love him,” he continued. “I love that he’s an incredible coach, mentor for me. And he’s pushed me in a lot of ways. Like everything, we don’t agree on absolutely everything. But that’s relationships.”

One of the points of tension, according to reports, has been Brady’s alternative approach to maintaining his health, including his preference to work out with personal trainer Alex Guerrero. Brady — along with tight end Rob Gronkowski, who also has trained extensively with Guerrero in recent years — was absent for the entirety of the Patriots’ offseason program except for mandatory minicamp earlier this week.

Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman, who is appealing a four-game performance-enhancing drug suspension, also trains with Guererro.

Brady was asked if he trains separately from the rest of the team.

“No, I wouldn’t say that, but I probably do some of my own techniques differently from the rest of the team,” Brady said. “The team, I would say, like most teams are very systematic in their approach. And what I learned, I guess, is different from some of the things that are systematic but that work for me.

“It’s nothing that I don’t talk about with my coach and owner [about]. ‘This is what I want to do; this is what I need to be the best player I can be and hopefully you can support that.'”

–Field Level Media

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New Jersey Allows Esports Betting With massive restriction

When New Jersey became the first state to allow sports betting after the Supreme Court decision, they initially said there was no betting on "high school sports events, electronic sports, and competitive video games." 

A few days later - after an outcry from the esports community - they amended the law saying that betting on

When New Jersey became the first state to allow sports betting after the Supreme Court decision, they initially said there was no betting on “high school sports events, electronic sports, and competitive video games.” 

A few days later – after an outcry from the esports community – they amended the law saying that betting on esports events is allowed, so long as every participant in the tournament is 18 or older.

In traditional sports that isn’t a problem. Very few players in any sport have the ability to compete at the highest level before being able to vote. In esports, without a physical requirement, many people as young as 13 have been successful in their game. Players like Scrub Killa in Rocket League and Mongraal in Fortnite have been able to compete at that young age.

Still, they are the exception not the rule. But, because of players like them, the entry into the most popular esports leagues and events is often below that age threshold. For example, League of Legends’ LCS is 17, Rocket League’s RLCS is 15.

DOTA 2’s The International, which boasts the highest prize pool in esports, has no age requirement either. Epic Games hasn’t released competitive details for Fortnite but with the games massive popularity in teens, 18 would prevent a lot of the player base from competing.

Their are two main third-party tournament organizers in esports, Dreamhack and ESL. Dreamhack has no minimum age requirement, so it’s out.

So what does that leave? ESL is still in, so long as the game is rated for 18+. That means first person shooter’s like CS:GO and Rainbow Six: Siege should be good.

In terms of leagues that fit the age requirement, there are three big ones in America. The Overwatch League which boasts the highest franchise fees in esports at $20 million is good – just don’t bet on Shanghai. The Call of Duty World League which is a favorite of many NFL players and the NBA 2K League are both eligible as well.

Betting on esports is a huge business with people already wagering in-game items on games. There will be demand and betting could be the catalyst that raises the age requirement to become a pro in other titles.

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Jets’ Claiborne a happy father after newborn’s health scare

WHIPPANY, N.J. (AP) — Morris Claiborne was in the middle of a walkthrough practice last summer when he got the call — finally — that he was eagerly anticipating.

It was time for his twin daughters to enter the world.

A New York Jets trainer had the cornerback's cellphone and was tasked with

WHIPPANY, N.J. (AP) — Morris Claiborne was in the middle of a walkthrough practice last summer when he got the call — finally — that he was eagerly anticipating.

It was time for his twin daughters to enter the world.

A New York Jets trainer had the cornerback’s cellphone and was tasked with letting him know if and when Claiborne’s now-wife Jennifer was heading to the hospital.

“I remember I saw the trainer walking on the field and he gave me, like, a look,” Claiborne recalled in an interview with The Associated Press at the family’s home. “I just ran. I took off running. I grabbed my phone from him and I went to Coach (Todd) Bowles and I was like, ‘Coach, it’s time,’ and he was like, ‘All right, congratulations.’

“And I remember just running out of the building and running to the hospital, and when I got up there I just looked at her.”

It was July 30, 2017, and Jennifer was 35 weeks along — two weeks before her scheduled cesarean section. But her water broke while she was watching the couple’s two English Bulldogs outside their home. She had to immediately head to Morristown Medical Center, about 2 1/2 miles away.

Meanwhile, Morris zipped from the Jets’ training facility in Florham Park to the hospital just over 3 miles away in time to be there to welcome his daughters.

“He came and it all happened within the hour,” Jennifer recalled. “It happened so fast, it was scary.”

Doctors performed the C-section and first delivered Ma’Kaila, who was quite underweight at 3 pounds, 8 ounces.

Ma’Liah came a few moments later, weighing in at a more robust 4 pounds, 13 ounces.

Ma’Kaila was immediately taken to the neonatal intensive care unit, separated from her sister — and mother — for the first time.

“I was asking, ‘Is everything OK?'” Morris said. “They were like, ‘She’s good. Everything’s good. It’s just that she’s underweight — too underweight.’ They wanted to take her back and start feeding her and try to get her to gain some weight.”

Ma’Kaila stayed in the NICU for the next two weeks, working up the strength to be sent home to her parents and sister.

For Morris, who was entering his first season with the Jets on a one-year, prove-it deal after four years with the Cowboys, it was a whirlwind of anxiety and excitement.

Somehow, he needed to keep his mind focused on football, while also wanting to make sure his wife and daughters had everything they needed while he was working.

“Oh, man,” he said, shaking his head. “We’d have meetings early in the morning and we had to stay over at the (players’) hotel, but Coach was giving me a little time to come here and stay with (Jennifer and Ma’Liah) instead of going to the hotel. I’d come (home) after meetings. We’d get done around 11 or so and I’d come here, check on her and make sure everything’s OK with her and then I’d head up to the hotel for curfew and we’d FaceTime all night.”

Claiborne’s coaches and teammates never knew of the hectic routine he was keeping throughout the summer.

Playbooks and Pampers.

Meetings and feedings.

Football and baby blankets.

“I don’t care if it was 10 minutes, I live so close to the facility that I was running home every single break to check on them and see if everything’s OK and then I’d get back to my job,” he said. “It was like that for a while, for the whole training camp. … It was chaos, but it was fun.”

Claiborne was in for the biggest surprise of all on Aug. 15 when he arrived home during a short break.

“I was like, ‘Babe, come here, look,'” Jennifer called out to him. “I was like, ‘Can you watch her real fast?’ And I was speaking of Ma’Liah.”

But she had brought Ma’Kaila home from the hospital earlier in the day and had both girls in the bed, laying them beside her with a video camera set on record to capture the moment.

“I wasn’t expecting to see both of them at all,” a wide-eyed Claiborne recalled. “I wasn’t ready for it at all. When I walked in, I was so used to seeing her (Ma’Liah) in the bed when I’d come in, and when I saw both of them laying there, my heart just dropped.

“I was like, ‘Oh, my God.’ It really hit me: We’ve got twins at the house. This is real now.”

Ma’Liah and Ma’Kaila are now 10 1/2 months old, healthy and full of personality.

Ma’Liah, according to Jennifer, is the more demanding of the two, and “she’s a Daddy’s girl.” Ma’Kaila is still slightly smaller than her sister, but is more independent — moving around on her own, playing and feeding herself.

“It gave me a sense of what I’m really playing football for, what I’m really doing it for,” said the 28-year-old Claiborne, who re-signed with the Jets on another one-year deal in the offseason. “It’s for my family and bringing these two precious little babies into the world, it opened my eyes to a much bigger picture.

“I’ve really learned that it’s not about yourself. Once you have kids, it’s about the kids, but I think I got a re-understanding of that once these two babies were born. I enjoy every moment of it.”

The family was planning to fly to its home in Dallas over the weekend to join Claiborne’s son Morris, who turns 9 in November, and daughter Madicyn, who’s 3, for a special Father’s Day.

“Having these girls made me understand that I really missed some valuable time with my son, but I was off in college (at LSU) and there was nothing I could really do about that,” Claiborne said. “My mindset was on making a way to feed him at that time. Just having them made me realize how much time at this age that I really missed that I would’ve loved to be there.

“I missed that time with him, but God’s given me another chance to experience that and I’m happy for it.”

And Morris and Jennifer, who got married in March in Texas, are still growing their family. They’re expecting another daughter in mid-November.

“I love being a father,” said Claiborne, who Jennifer rates as “really good” at changing diapers. “I love coming home to these faces. I love after games, these kids don’t know whether you had a good game or not, they don’t know what went on at practice. They don’t understand none of that. But when I come home, it’s all smiles because they light up when I walk into the room.

“That puts a smile on my face, just to know they love me unconditionally.”

___

For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL

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Beckham tells reporters he’ll be at Giants’ camp

Beckham tells reporters he'll be at Giants' camp

Wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. on Saturday told reporters he'll be in attendance when the New York Giants open training camp on July 25.

"Yes sir. Yes you will," Beckham told reporters who asked if they'll see him at the Giants camp

Beckham tells reporters he’ll be at Giants’ camp

Wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. on Saturday told reporters he’ll be in attendance when the New York Giants open training camp on July 25.

“Yes sir. Yes you will,” Beckham told reporters who asked if they’ll see him at the Giants camp as he left a camp he’s hosting for some 550 first- through eighth-graders in Metuchen, N.J., on Saturday.

He also said “No holdout,” when asked if he’s planning such a move as he seeks a new contract.

Beckham looked pretty well recovered at camp, showing off his trademark one-handed catches.

Seeking a contract extension as he enters the fifth-year option of his rookie deal, Beckham showed for the start of organized team activities — which are voluntary — in May but had been absent for two weeks before showing up for mandatory minicamp last week.

The 25-year-old’s appearance for the start of OTAs was seen as a show of good faith with the organization, after his name was a popular one in trade rumors as a new coaching staff and general manager (Dave Gettleman) took over this offseason. Owner John Mara told reporters in May that there isn’t a “sense of urgency” to extend Beckham, adding, “The contract will get done when it’s supposed to get done.”

Beckham is set to make close to $8.5 million in 2018 and has made no secret of his desire for a new deal, suggesting last year he wanted to become the league’s highest-paid player.

While that won’t happen, Beckham is likely angling to top the wideout market, which is led by Antonio Brown at $17 million per season. Three of Beckham’s classmates from the 2014 draft, Mike Evans ($16.5 million annually), Sammy Watkins ($16 million) and Jarvis Landry ($15.1 million), received lucrative contracts this offseason to move them into the top five among receivers.

Though he played in just four games last season due to injury, Beckham has averaged 107 catches, 1,506 yards and 13 touchdowns per 16 games in his four-year career.

–Field Level Media

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Coaching roots run deep for new Packers DC Mike Petttine

GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) — Coaching runs deep in Mike Pettine's family.

Vacations to the Jersey shore as a child gave the Green Bay Packers' defensive coordinator a glimpse of the life. His father, a high school football coach in suburban Philadelphia, took a briefcase to the beach, settled a chair into the

GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) — Coaching runs deep in Mike Pettine’s family.

Vacations to the Jersey shore as a child gave the Green Bay Packers’ defensive coordinator a glimpse of the life. His father, a high school football coach in suburban Philadelphia, took a briefcase to the beach, settled a chair into the sand and went to work.

“I do the same … But it’s a backpack. I’m a little more with the times,” Pettine said.

The lessons passed on by dad stay with him to this day.

Mike Pettine Sr., who died in Feburary 2017, was one of the most successful coaches in Pennsylvania prep history. Pettine, 51, is coaching again in the NFL after being hired by head coach Mike McCarthy to oversee the Packers defense. He returned after largely staying out of football following a two-year stint as head coach of the Cleveland Browns, serving as a consultant with Seattle in 2017.

“I thought it was normal for everybody else’s dad to carry a briefcase on to the beach,” Pettine said after a recent Packers practice. “He always had (football) on his mind, it was always there. If it wasn’t direct, it was always kind of lurking. He always had pen and paper close, if an idea popped into his head.”

Those ideas often worked.

The elder Pettine won 326 games at Central Bucks West High School and four state titles. He retired in 1999 following a third consecutive unbeaten season.

Pettine played for his father and later served as an assistant coach. He ended up across the field from his father, too, after taking the head coaching job at rival North Penn — matchups that often made Philadelphia-area headlines. Pettine took over a team that went from hovering at about .500 to challenging his father’s team for state supremacy.

All five head-to-head meetings went to Dad.

“The headline ‘Father knows best’ was getting a little bit old,” Pettine quipped.

The elder Pettine was a Philadelphia Eagles fan, though he had no qualms about rooting for whatever team that his son was working for as he climbed the NFL coaching ladder. Pettine’s first stop in the pros came in 2002 as an assistant with the Baltimore Ravens.

Dad would serve as a consultant. Pettine would send him DVDs to view film. Later, he could watch on an iPad.

“A lot of times he would start the conversations with, ‘I know I’m just a high school football coach, however …,'” Pettine recounted. “He would give us 10 things and they were all dead on. … He just had a great eye for the game.”

A high school coach can sometimes resemble a drill sergeant on the job. The style in the NFL is a bit different. For Pettine, it’s about creating an environment where players and coaches work together.

But he admired the way his father adjusted to players in a career that started in the 1960s.

“I thought his strength was his ability to adapt, where he goes from an age of kids where they never questioned authority and by the time he finished that had essentially flipped,” he said.

“And I think you have to be able to adapt, and I feel the same way when you’re working with NFL players,” he said. “I just think it’s important to know your audience, understand that you’re working with the, trying to help them be successful, which in turn will help you be successful.”

Team film sessions at CB West with Pettine Sr., on Mondays after Friday games stick out, too.

“You would never know (they won) if you sat in on those film sessions — you would think they lost by 30 when they had won by 30,” Pettine said. “But I’m a big believer in there’s no better teaching tool than seeing it on film. You paint a picture, you show a guy, ‘Hey, this is how it’s supposed to look.'”

It was a way that his father held his players accountable, which is also important to Pettine.

“My dad said, ‘Stop the projector, turn on the lights. Quick, stand up and explain to your teammates what you were just doing.’ Nobody wanted that to happen,” Pettine said. “And that’s something I’ve always believed, being honest with your players, being direct, that’s by far the best way to go about things.”

With one big difference.

“I don’t turn on the lights,” Pettine said with a laugh.

___

More AP NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL

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Reports: Free agent DT Miller suspended 6 games

Reports: Free agent DT Miller suspended 6 games

Free agent defensive tackle Roy Miller was suspended for six games by the NFL seven months after being arrested on domestic battery charges, according to multiple reports Friday.

No reason for the suspension was reported or released by the league, but a

Reports: Free agent DT Miller suspended 6 games

Free agent defensive tackle Roy Miller was suspended for six games by the NFL seven months after being arrested on domestic battery charges, according to multiple reports Friday.

No reason for the suspension was reported or released by the league, but a six-game ban is the standard punishment for first-time offenders of the domestic violence policy the NFL installed in 2014.

Miller, 30, was released by the Kansas City Chiefs in November two days after his arrest following an alleged altercation with his wife, Nicole, at the Florida home of the couple of five children.

“We did release Roy and we’re going to move on from that,” Chiefs coach Andy Reid said at the time, per the Kansas City Star. “I can’t really talk about anything from a legal standpoint, so I’m gonna just leave it at that.”

A nine-year-veteran, Miller played in seven games for Kansas City last season in a reserve role, making six total tackles. The 6-foot-2, 318-pounder was originally drafted in the third round by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and spent four seasons with the Bucs. Miller then played four seasons with the Jacksonville Jaguars before hooking on with the Chiefs in 2017.

Miller has 8.0 career sacks and 250 tackles in 119 games (84 starts).

–Field Level Media

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Rhode Island Takes 1st Step to Legal Sports Betting

The post Rhode Island Takes 1st Step to Legal Sports Betting appeared first on SportsHandle.

Late Friday night, the Rhode Island General Assembly overwhelmingly approved an appropriations bill that includes making sports betting legal in the state. The General Assembly voted, 66-7, to approve the measure, albeit about

The post Rhode Island Takes 1st Step to Legal Sports Betting appeared first on SportsHandle.

Late Friday night, the Rhode Island General Assembly overwhelmingly approved an appropriations bill that includes making sports betting legal in the state. The General Assembly voted, 66-7, to approve the measure, albeit about seven hours later than the vote was first scheduled. The vote marks the first step in what will likely be a fairly streamlined process to get Rhode Island sports betting online. The Senate is expected to pass the appropriations bill next week and then Governor Gina Raimondo will sign off on it. Raimondo has $23.5 million in sports betting revenue in her budget.

Rhode Island becomes the second state since the Supreme Court struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act on May 14 to pass legal sports betting. New Jersey was the first. It did so on June 11 and was accepting sports bets three days later. Delaware, which did not need to pass new legislation post-PASPA, was the first state outside of Nevada to begin accepting legal sports bets when it did so on June 8.

Rhode Island has two tribal-owned casinos, Twin River and Tiverton. According to the Associated Press, Rhode Island lawmakers “finalized the deal with the casinos and the betting system’s operator Friday before budget deliberations began.”

The State of Rhode island Will Receive 51 Percent of Sports Betting Revenue, Should RI Sports Betting Be Made Legal. 

The bill calls for a five-year deal under which the company International Gaming Technology will be the operator at both casinos. Sports betting revenue will be disbursed as such: 51 percent to the state, 32 percent to IGT and 17 percent to Twin River, which owns and manages both casinos. In addition, the towns of Lincoln and Tiverton, where the casinos are located, will get a $100,000 annual fee for being “host communities.”

Rhode Island becomes the latest state to shun the professional sports leagues. The bill does not include the “integrity fee” that the leagues have been lobbying for, and, in fact, expressly forbids the payment of any fee at all to the professional leagues.

“It was a collaborative effort with the state coming together to do one thing … to get the best possible deal for the taxpayers,” House Majority Leader Joe Shekarchi, told WPRI immediately after the vote. “I’m very proud of the House’s involvement in this.”

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More Wrangling, But No Voting in New York State

The post More Wrangling, But No Voting in New York State appeared first on SportsHandle.

On Friday, S7900, a bill to legalize sports betting in New York, underwent amendment and new printing as lawmakers continue to wrangle in the hopes of passing sports betting legislation before the session ends on June

The post More Wrangling, But No Voting in New York State appeared first on SportsHandle.

On Friday, S7900, a bill to legalize sports betting in New York, underwent amendment and new printing as lawmakers continue to wrangle in the hopes of passing sports betting legislation before the session ends on June 20. The bill, sponsored by Senator John Bonacic (R-District 42) is on its third iteration.

The bill, now S7900C, now calls for an integrity fee to be paid to the professional leagues of “one fifth of one percent,” down from a quarter of one percent in previous versions of the bill. The legislation also calls for the professional sports leagues to bring proof to the state of what was spent on integrity monitoring in order to receive compensation. Previously, the fee was set to be paid with no strings attached.

The pro leagues, the NBA and Major League Baseball in particular, have been lobbying states across the nation to include a payout for increased integrity monitoring as sports betting becomes legal. But so far, no state has passed legislation with a fee, and if New York state does, it would be the first.

New York Lawmakers Are Pushing for Legal NY Sports Betting, But Can’t Reach a Consensus, and Prospects Appear Dim. 

Earlier this month, legendary ex-New York Yankees manager Joe Torre became the latest in a parade of former and current athletes to visit the state capital and lobby for the integrity fee.

The new language in Bonacic’s bill appears similar to the language in an Assembly bill introduced by Gary Pretlow (D-District 89) last week.

New York State Bills on Sports Betting, Originally Proposed in 2017, Head to Committee As New York Gears Up for Possible Repeal of Federal Ban on Sports Wagering
An OTB parlor in New York

Despite the changes, the chance for passage appears dim as there are multiple issues that still must be ironed out. Thursday, Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie (D-District 83) held little hope that sports betting would be made legal before the end of the session.

“Members raised significant issues, so I would say at this point there isn’t enough support within the Democratic conference to want to go forward on sports gambling,” Heastie told the Democrat and Chronicle

Lawmakers have reportedly been meeting all week to come to a consensus, but as yet have not.

New York Lawmakers May Be Feeling Pressure to Make NY Sports Betting Legal After Neighboring New Jersey Did So Last Week. 

A second bill, S1282, which was originally introduced in January 2017, was recommitted to the Judiciary Committee on Thursday after languishing in that same committee since January of this year. The bill would allow for sports betting in New York, but would send the final decision to the voters.

Empire State lawmakers appear to be feeling pressure to legalize sports betting sooner than later after neighbor New Jersey did June 11 and accepted its first sports bet at Monmouth Park on June 14. Pennsylvania, which borders New York to the west, legalized sports betting in 2017 but has yet to begin accepting sports wagers. Further south, Delaware became the first state since the Supreme Court struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act on May 14 to offer sports betting, when it did so on June 8.

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NFL notebook: Winslow Jr. accused of repeated sex crimes

NFL notebook: Winslow Jr. accused of repeated sex crimes

Former NFL tight end Kellen Winslow Jr. is accused of two kidnappings and rapes of women in their 50s and two burglaries with intent to rape elderly women among five separate offenses since March, according to a criminal complaint obtained Friday by the San

NFL notebook: Winslow Jr. accused of repeated sex crimes

Former NFL tight end Kellen Winslow Jr. is accused of two kidnappings and rapes of women in their 50s and two burglaries with intent to rape elderly women among five separate offenses since March, according to a criminal complaint obtained Friday by the San Diego Union-Tribune.

Winslow, 34, pleaded not guilty in Vista, Calif., on Friday to eight felony charges and one misdemeanor. He remains jailed with no bail.

On Thursday, Winslow was arrested and charged with two counts of kidnapping with intent to commit rape, two counts of forcible rape, one count of forcible sodomy, one count of forcible oral copulation, two counts of residential burglary and one count of indecent exposure.

According to the Union-Tribune, the complaint alleges the crimes were committed in five separate incidents: kidnapping, rape and forced oral copulation of a 54-year-old woman in March; kidnapping, rape and forced sodomy of a 59-year-old woman in May; indecent exposure in May; burglary with the intent to rape a 71-year-old woman in June; and burglary with the intent to rape an 86-year-old woman in June. Winslow faces life in prison if convicted of all charges.

–Martavis Bryant is facing a potential one-year suspension just six weeks into his fresh start with the Oakland Raiders. According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, the team fears Bryant could receive a third suspension for substance-abuse violations.

The Raiders “are awaiting final word on the situation,” which is believed to pertain to the substance-abuse policy, per the report.

A fourth-round pick out of Clemson in 2014, Bryant showed talent in the 2014 and 2015 seasons, scoring 15 touchdowns in his first 21 career games despite being a secondary option on a team loaded with offensive talent. The Raiders acquired him for a third-round pick during the 2018 NFL Draft.

–Dallas Cowboys defensive end David Irving was suspended four games without pay for violating the NFL policy on substances of abuse, the NFL announced.

It marks the second straight season in which Irving will miss the first four games due to a suspension. Last year, he was penalized for violating the performance-enhancing drug policy.

The 24-year-old Irving had seven sacks in just eight games last season. He also missed the final four games due to a concussion. Irving was a restricted free agent in the offseason, and the Cowboys tendered him for $2.91 million. He will lose just under $685,000 in salary.

–The NFL announced it has suspended Cleveland Browns offensive tackle Donald Stephenson two games for violating the league’s substance abuse policy.

Stephenson, 29, will be eligible for reinstatement on Sept. 17 ahead of the Browns’ Week 3 home game against the New York Jets. He is allowed to take part in offseason practices and play in preseason games.

The six-year NFL veteran has missed all of Cleveland’s offseason activities. His absence from this week’s mandatory minicamp carries a fine of $84,435, per NFL.com.

–Field Level Media

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