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Garrett Reid had steroids in his possession at time of death

Was working as strength coach for Eagles, who release statements Brad Biggs

Print This December 17, 2012, 07:34 PM EST

The death of Andy Reid’s son Garrett Reid during training camp was a horrible tragic story that struck the family of the longtime coach and the Philadelphia Eagles.

Now, the story is being replayed as authorities disclosed that Garrett Reid, who died of a heroin overdose, was in possession of steroids at the time of his death. The reason that is even partially an issue for the Eagles is Garrett Reid was working as an assistant strength and conditioning coach at the time.

The Eagles understand the implications that can be in play and the club pointed out that no players on the team’s roster have tested positive for the type of drugs Garrett Reid had in his possession.

“The news today on Garrett Reid’s possession of steroids is disappointing,” owner Jeffrey Lurie said in a statement distributed by the team. “It’s clear the conduct in which he apparently engaged runs counter to the values and principles mandated for everyone associated with our organization. We have spoken with the league office and have pledged our full cooperation with their requests should there be any. While we remained saddened by the tragic end of a young man’s life and know how hard this must be for the entire Reid family, we are extremely confident that Garrett’s actions were unknown to those around him and did not involve our football team.
 

“The NFL has a rigorous drug testing program for its players. It is a matter of record that none of our players has tested positive for any of the steroids mentioned in the district attorney’s report.”
 

Andy Reid also issued a statement on the matter: “Today’s report saddens me greatly, but only confirms the troubles Garrett encountered in the final years of his life. As parents, we were encouraged by his apparent progress but, like many addicts, he was able to conceal the signs of relapse.
 

“Jeffrey Lurie, the Eagles organization and the people of Philadelphia have been remarkably supportive of my family throughout our ordeal. I am confident that my son’s decisions did not affect our football team in any way. I cannot apologize enough for any adverse appearances that my son’s actions may have for an organization and a community that has been nothing but supportive of our family.”

It is during the holiday season that it is probably even more trying for Reid and his family.

Follow me on Twitter: @BradBiggs

Brad Biggs covers the Bears for the Chicago Tribune
 

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