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NFL Draft: One final look at Kendall Wright

Using video to break down the 3-step 'hot' read. Matt Bowen

April 26, 2012
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Click here for the entire Inside the Playbook series.

Click here for my previous breakdown on Kendall Wright.

Before the NFL draft kicks off tonight, let’s take one final look at Kendall Wright vs. Oklahoma from this past season. The 3-step slant (or “hot”) vs. pressure. A simple route concept that the Baylor WR can make some money on when he lines up on Sundays.

Let’s take a look at the replay and get into some coaching points:

- The main reason I chose this video is because of Wright’s initial alignment. I like the idea of the WR aligning inside of the numbers at the pro level when the offense has Posse (3 WR, 1, TE, 1 RB) or Jet (4 WR, 1 RB) personnel on the field. This allows him a “two-way go” (inside or outside release) and he becomes a primary option vs. pressure-based defenses. And I think he can have a productive season as a rookie if he can run routes that break back to the middle of the field.

-The way I see it, this is a “hot read” at the line of scrimmage. Baylor is using “counter protection” off of the run action with a 3x1 alignment to the field. Check to the 3-step slant (with a hard inside release) and give QB Robert Griffin III a quick, simple read to defeat pressure. This applies to all levels of football. Read a pre-snap blitz look? Then check to the 3-step game and let your WR go make a play.

- Love the ability here from Wright in the open field. I know the WR can run the 9 (fade) and 8 (post) vs. man-coverage and Cover 2. However, if you want to produce at the NFL level, you have to make plays after the catch. This is an example of Wright finding running room; using his vision to cutback and showing the strength to run out of tackles.

- A quick coaching point from a defensive perspective. Check out the DB in coverage vs. Wright. For starters, the cushion (from an inside leverage position) is too soft. If you know pressure is called in the huddle, then play for the ball to come out—and don’t guess on the route. Second, go make the tackle. If you stop your feet in the open field vs. the speed and athletic ability of Wright, you will be forced to lunge and dive (usually with your head down) on the tackle attempt.

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