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Post Draft Notes

Breaking down each round's payday, the myth of sliding draftees, and criticizing the networks. Jack Bechta

Print This May 14, 2014, 05:30 AM EST

So how much will the Rookies make?:

Here is what the 2013 picks were paid (*note these amounts will increase with the 2014 cap increase):

1st Round
1st Pick: Total Compensation (TC): $ 22,190,498     Signing Bonus (SB): $14,518,544
16th Pick: TC: $8,885,300     SB: $4,842,036

2nd Round
1st Pick: TC: $5,469,104     SB: $2,357,528
16th Pick: TC: $4,300,401     SB: $1,507,564

3rd Round
1st Pick: TC: $3,126,304     SB: $703,304
16th Pick: TC: $2,853,876     SB: $598,876

4th Round
1st Pick: TC: $2,739,528     SB: $497,028
16th Pick: TC: $2,605,200     SB: $445,200

5th Round
1st Pick: TC: $2,400,512     SB: $215,512
16th Pick: TC: $2,351,160     SB: $191,160

6th Round
1st Pick: TC: $2,288,820     SB: $128,820
16th Pick: TC: $2,264,852     SB: $104,852

7th Round
1st Pick: TC: $2,254,124     SB: $69,124
16th Pick: TC: $2,219,172     SB: $59,172

Teams will try to spread the signing bonus for each player over a year or two. The Cardinals try to spread their signing bonuses to be paid over three years for no other reason then to hoard their cash as long as possible. Agents will negotiate the payout of bonuses.

Slips and reaches:

It pains me to hear the word “slip” and “reach” by the talking heads in the media. I’m curious as to how many times the words “slide”, “sliding”, “slipping”, and “falling” were used in describing Johnny Manziel, and Teddy Bridgewater during the first round of the draft? Answer: Too many times! Furthermore, ESPN loves having a player “fall” each year to create some made for TV drama at the expense and pain of a hopeful draftee.

In reality, there is no such thing as “slips and reaches” on draft day (weekend). Players go to the team that wants and needs them at a certain pick. Teams have to calculate the risk of waiting another 31 picks to get the player (and/or a position) they covet. Certain players fit certain offensive schemes better than others. The character, medical and football IQ of a player is more important to some teams than others. Our noted mock draft experts don’t always have the same intelligence the teams have so they may rank them differently than a team would. So the only way a player can be judged as to be a “slide or a reach” is about three years from now after we get to see how they’ve developed and played.

Post draft grades:

I hate seeing teams get draft grades by the media. Why isn’t anyone grading drafts 3 or 4 years later? That’s the only time a team can be accurately graded on their draft. When the Pats drafted Tom Brady in the 6th round in 2000, they should have received an A+ that year, but only after Tom played. Post draft grades are worthless!

Note to ESPN and the NFL Network:

Please spend less time on repeated storylines and more time on the picks themselves. When the Cowboys take a player in the 5th round or the Jaguars take a 2nd rounder, their fan bases want to know more about the player and why their team possibly took them. They want to know that with the size of the receivers and TEs Tampa took, it’s going to put pressure on the Falcons, Saints and Panthers safety positions. More importantly, these young men work their whole lives to get to this dream moment (getting drafted in any round) so give those players some TV time and introduce them to their new fan bases. Do your homework and tell us more about these players.

The NFL fan is more knowledgeable than the networks give them credit. They don’t need the same storylines regurgitated over and over, give them deeper coverage on the players and their team.

Congratulations to all the draft picks, undrafted free agents and my clients and their families. Here’s hoping you make the best of your opportunity.

Follow me on Twitter: @Jackbechta

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