RSS

Ten Reasons Why NFL Players Go Broke

An observation from 25 years of experience. Jack Bechta

Print This May 30, 2012, 04:00 PM EST

6) Guilt and the family: It’s amazing the number of NFL players who come from single parent homes. Many grew up with the help of the entire extended family, who is usually poor. When all resources are shared in helping one another, things are copasetic. However, when the athlete starts earning there is a feeling of guilt and a desire to help those who helped him. Unfortunately, it’s never just a one-time event. Once the pipeline of fiscal aid is spread about it’s hard to turn the faucet off. It’s difficult to say “no” to the brother who is about to lose his house or the uncle who is behind on the car payment. There are ways to help the family but there is usually not a realistic plan in place to do so. I have a client who paid off his parent’s home loan of $200,000 to find out two years later they refinanced and borrowed $150,000 against the house that was once free and clear of any debt. Of course they got behind again in their payments and had little to show for the $150,000 they spent. And of course, my client was upset but he paid it off as well. After all, it's mom and dad.

7) A few more years: Just ask any retired player if he thought he would play at least one or two more years and I promise you 90% would say “yes”. In thinking they will play a few more years they feel more money will come that they have earmarked to save.

8) Divorce: 50% gone! When a player retires he goes from having a structured environment (which he has had his whole life), status, fame and a steady income, to trying to figure out how to add value to the household that worked around him and his routine for the last several years. He will struggle with developing a role in his own family, the workplace and society. A lot of athletes get depressed and a near majority of them hideout in a bottle and/or on the golf course. No longer the breadwinner, many wives of NFL players have told me they feel like their husband is another child they have to take care of. Many of these situations end in divorces with no prenuptial in place.

9) Living above their means: I constantly remind my players that their peers are the people that they graduated college with not the guys in the locker room. Any amount of monies made above your peers should be saved, invested and allocated for future needs. It’s okay to live in apartment for three years before buying a house and two cars. However, the locker room becomes the peer group and once many athletes taste the sweet life it’s difficult to go backwards.

10) Keeping up with the vets: One phenomenon that hits most rookies is the desire to keep up with the vets. They see how the vets live and usually emulate their life styles. Many vets are into their second contract; usually a large one, but the rooks feel like they need to drive the same cars, wear the same clothes and own similar jewelry. Making all the classic mistakes listed above starts the player off by borrowing from the following year. Once this pattern starts its hard to stop. Many players feel they will get ahead on their next deal that for many may never come. For others, when the next deal does come the degree of spending just increases. One of my former clients just told me his buddy owns a Bentley dealership (in a southeast city) and four NFL players from his market have pre-ordered $350,000 cars.

These ten reasons why players go broke are indeed elementary and the only thing that can curtail the pattern is on going education, intervention, and constant counseling of basic life skills.

Follow me on Twitter: @Jackbechta

NFP's Introduction to Scouting Class is now registering for the summer session! Discounted pricing until April 14th! REGISTER NOW!

Page 2 Page 1 Read More
NFP Inside Content. All Season.