Posts by Dr. David Chao

Podcast: Dr. David Chao Examines ACL Injuries and QB Health

Listen to “Pro Football Doc 8/13/2018” on Spreaker.

 

Dr. David Chao

Two decades of NFL team physician experience including two Super Bowls and two Pro Bowls. Providing unique perspective to injuries and the NFL sideline/locker room. Successful orthopedic surgery and sports medicine practice in Southern California.

Read More -52 Words

Monday Morning MD: New formula to extend Tom Brady’s career

Despite being hated by Patriots fans, the commissioner may have actually helped New England win this and more future Super Bowls.

How did a 39 year-old quarterback outlast a young defense that in the first half was flying to the ball and applying pressure without blitzing? The Patriots had more than twice the offensive plays

Despite being hated by Patriots fans, the commissioner may have actually helped New England win this and more future Super Bowls.

How did a 39 year-old quarterback outlast a young defense that in the first half was flying to the ball and applying pressure without blitzing? The Patriots had more than twice the offensive plays as the Falcons. The lopsided time of possession difference was even worse than the stats indicated (40:31 vs 23:27) as New England’s 14 more incomplete passes added little clock time but substantial real time on the field. Atlanta defended for an unprecedented 93 plays. Brady passed more times than Matt Ryan even touched the ball. By the fourth quarter, the pass rush seemed to wear itself out and the tight coverage began to trail.

Don’t forget that the offense led by Brady was on the field the same number of plays as the “rise up” young defense. Why did the aging quarterback not seem tired? Brady is dedicated to his training regimen but there may be more to it.

The four-week forced hiatus where he not only missed games but had to be away from the facility and could not practice may have helped the veteran QB and his team in the long run. The Patriots with Brady only playing a 12 game season still ended up with the playoff bye and home field advantage.

The early rest and shortened season may have helped Brady during the playoffs and Super Bowl. He certainly doesn’t need the added reps. Perhaps it played a role in his strong 4th quarter as the Falcons defenders ran out of gas.

Bill Belichick used a boxing analogy at the MVP ceremony this AM saying “the mark of a true champion is winning after getting knocked down.” Staying in fight game analogies, this contest seemed like the famous rope-a-dope fight during the 1974 “Rumble in the Jungle”. The young George Foreman came out strong and punched himself out as Muhammad Ali conserved energy and stayed strong to finish the fight in the end.

During my time with the Chargers, LaDainian Tomlinson never played in preseason games. He didn’t suit up his rookie year due to a holdout. The newly announced Hall of Famer played so well his rookie season and became so valuable, the team decided to not mess with success. During his illustrious career, he always sat out preseason games. Perhaps this season will set the new precedent for the Patriots.

Father Time catches up to all of us. Perhaps the shortened season model is something Brady and the Patriots will adopt going forward to combat the effects of age. Inadvertently, the most hated man in New England may have helped the Patriots to their fifth Super Bowl and perhaps extended the career of Brady into winning more.

MMMD 1: Did injury play a role in who ultimately won?

By video, it was clear that Alex Mack would not be 100% even before the news of a broken/chipped fibula. He played surprisingly well but did give up the key sack to Trey Flowers that prevented the Falcons from icing the game with a late field goal.

Julio Jones was also still hampered by his turf toe injury. He made a spectacular catch but had a subpar performance for him with only four catches. Jones is reportedly still undecided on offseason surgery.

The lengthened pre-game and halftime made it harder on both Dwight Freeney and Chris Hogan who were playing through muscle injuries. Freeney recorded a sack but missed a short portion of the game with his calf and undoubtedly was not 100%. Hogan recorded 4 catches with his thigh issues but was not nearly as productive as during the AFC Championship Game.

Dont’a Hightower played through a likely left shoulder labral tear and has been using a harness/brace. He effectively used his left arm to make the pivotal strip sack resulting in the key Falcons fumble.

MMMD 2: Athletic trainers and doctors deserve rings too

The medical staff plays a vital role in not only health and safety, but also in a team’s winning. It is right that they too will be awarded with Super Bowl rings.

There is no better example of medical helping a team win than this year’s Super Bowl. The key play was Dont’a Hightower’s strip sack fumble. Despite a likely labral tear (which will need offseason surgery), he made the game-changing play with his injured arm. Doctors and athletic trainers had him safely on the field with a shoulder harness that provided stability yet did not restrict his motion to prevent reaching Matt Ryan to cause the turnover that launched the Patriots to victory.

C4JtXQ5UYAAaiJT

This is nothing new for the Patriots ATCs as they have enjoyed many Championships. The head team doctor is a rookie this year, as was the lead physician two years ago when New England last won it all. In my 17+ years in the NFL, my team never even made it to the big game. But trust me, I am very happy for them as I know how much work is put in and how special it is.

MMMD 3: NFLPA agenda

Each year at the union players press conference, there seems to be a main agenda push. This year, the call is for teams to follow the concussion protocols exactly. For years, the mantra has been changing and advancing the head injury rules. Now, the players seem happy with the rules and want them strictly enforced.

Recall only two years ago, there was controversy over a big hit on Julian Edelman. That was the genesis of the medical timeout rule. Last year a second concussion spotter was added. Sideline replay, neutral independent physicians, standardized testing, mandatory rules for going to the locker room are just some of the many changes.

It is noteworthy that no new rules are being requested. Last year the commissioner announced a structure for penalties to teams of fines and/or draft picks for violations. To date, no one has been penalized.

The Dolphins were recently warned over their handling of Matt Moore.. The Chiefs are being investigated now over their handling of Chris Conley. I know Kansas City has a quality medical staff and the head athletic trainer is the current President of the Pro Football Trainers Athletic Society. I do not know the specifics of their care during the Division Round game in question. However, don’t be surprised if penalties are assessed for the first time as that is the push of the NFLPA.

MMMD 4: Pain medication lawsuit

News broke during Super Bowl week that the Falcons were worried about their reliance on painkillers in 2010 and how the team spent nearly three times the league average on narcotics. I am not an attorney and I do not know details about the pending lawsuit but I don’t believe this story is not nearly as explosive as it sounds on the surface. In fact, it is my understanding that some teams, including the Falcons, have been dropped from the legal action (although they could be added back in).

To me, the emails show that Atlanta executives acted as soon as they realized their team used more pain medication than the rest of the league. Medical staff changes were made to make sure this problem didn’t go forward.

The Falcons should be applauded not criticized for their actions. In medicine, there is something called peer review. Any internal criticisms and actions to improve medical care are exempt from attorney discovery. The purpose is to encourage the process of improving patient care and to remove the fear of plaintiff attorney discovery. Here it seems like the Falcons found a problem and then acted to correct it.

MMMD 5: Medical Mike Pereira

As most of you realize, I am not a trained professional writer or full-time media member. I have a “day job” as an orthopedic surgeon. I hope this and my almost two decades of experience as an NFL team physician gives me the unique perspective that you enjoy. Hopefully, I can be as good at analyzing injures as Pereira is at breaking down the rules.

I have written a 1500 word article for over three straight years with a one main and seven subtopic format including through the offseason. Add in watching games, keeping up with news, speaking to other reporters, my SiriusXM sport medical analyst duties and my Real Football Network work. It is almost a 40 hour a week second job..

I enjoyed my time at Radio Row and the game. I especially enjoyed taking the media bus all week long. Every ride provided a nice opportunity to randomly meet a fellow media member that we have been mutually following. I was so surprised and flattered that a few fans recognized me and even asked to have their picture taken with me.

MMMD 6 Mrs. ProFootballDoc

I have to thank my wife as she has been so supportive. She takes the kids every Sunday so I can do football. This past week she was single parent for the week as I attended Radio Row and the Super Bowl. She is eight and a half months pregnant and still managed to take the kids to Disneyland for her birthday. There is NO ONE like her.

I also want to thank my co-stars on the Periscope broadcast, Davis and Dylan. My weekends are free again so more Daddy time on the way.

MMMD 7: ProFootballDoc scorecard

This marks the end of my tally of initial impression right/wrong for this season. There may be adjustments as new information is revealed but any subsequent injuries will not count to this total.

This year concludes with a 95.1% record (203-10) of correct injury predictions. Last year the final record was 94.3% (165-10) and the year before that was 137-11 (92.6%). The number of first impression assessments have gone up slightly as well as the percentage correct. With a three-year track record, I am not sure if I will track it again next year as the concept seems to be proven. Using video and insider medical knowledge is at least 90% accurate.

Dr. David Chao

Two decades of NFL team physician experience including two Super Bowls and two Pro Bowls. Providing unique perspective to injuries and the NFL sideline/locker room. Successful orthopedic surgery and sports medicine practice in Southern California.

Read More 1623 Words

Monday Morning MD: “Witch hunt” season is on

As the numbers of games dwindle, there is more time to deal with unfinished business. Thus the administrative “witch hunt” season is on.

The Dolphins were admonished (but not penalized) over their handling of Matt Moore during the Wild Card round. There was no criticism of the care he received. The Unaffiliated Neurotrauma Consultant participated

As the numbers of games dwindle, there is more time to deal with unfinished business. Thus the administrative “witch hunt” season is on.

The Dolphins were admonished (but not penalized) over their handling of Matt Moore during the Wild Card round. There was no criticism of the care he received. The Unaffiliated Neurotrauma Consultant participated and agreed with the treatment and return to play process. Bear in mind it was a road game where the UNC is local to the Pittsburgh area and probably a Steelers fan. The purpose of the UNC is to first hand witness and provide player protection. Despite the UNC not requiring a locker room evaluation and agreeing with care, the team medical staff was still criticized for not following the concussion protocol.

There was the perception of rushing Moore back into the game since he only missed one play. With the referee and TV delays, I timed that Moore was out for exactly five minutes before he returned, which is the equivalent of seven or eight plays of real time. A sideline screening exam takes two to three minutes. Blood in the mouth is considered by the league to be a sign of concussion requiring locker room evaluation. Apparently there was a trace amount on Moore, but not enough to concern the Dolphins or independent doctor. Of course the slight blood could have come on a different play but on this technicality the Dolphins were criticized and warned of future penalties.

Now attention is focused on the Chiefs for their handling of Chris Conley in the AFC Divisional Round. With last year’s announcements of potential team penalties/fines for medical staff transgressions, it seems the NFL and NFLPA are destined to find someone to punish. The Chiefs head ATC is the current president of the Pro Football Athletic Trainers Society, which makes him a high profile target. Add to that the fact that he has been in the news this season and previously related to head injury and sets the Chiefs up to be a prime candidate to become a scapegoat.

I do not know the details of what the Chiefs did or did not do in their evaluation of Conley. This is why I have advocated for transparency. Why not let the UNC describe what happened on the field, sideline and locker room? Referees talk to a pool reporter after the game to help explain what the officials were thinking. Allowing the UNC to do this might clear up the perception that players were not cared for and might even apply more pressure to do the right thing with the doctor knowing he/she will have to answer publicly for it.

Currently the NFL does not have a full-time medical officer. Normally that person would jointly conduct the investigation with the NFLPA physician. With only one physician involved, penalties become more likely as the NFLPA physician has no counter. It is like only one side having an attorney in court or only one side having an expert witness in trial. The outcomes potentially get skewed.

Protocols are guidelines not rules. The NFL and NFLPA should stop practicing medicine and allow the UNC and team physicians to operate. They should allow them to speak to clear up misperceptions. If the independent physician is complaining, that should be fully and aggressively investigated with full representation from both sides.

MMMD 1: “Witch hunt” part 2

There has been lots of conjecture on fines/penalties for the Seahawks not disclosing Richard Sherman’s MCL injury. I have explained why I feel Seattle will escape punishment. Sherman has now confirmed my thought that the MCL injury was minor. Thus, there was no requirement to list it on the report.

Now the Steelers are undergoing scrutiny for not listing Le’Veon Bell’s groin injury. Last year, the Colts were investigated for not listing Andrew Luck’s rib injuries, but no penalties resulted.

The reality is there are many more injuries on every NFL team than listed in the injury report. The speed limit is 55mph but everyone on the highway is going 65mph. Only the ones going 75mph will be ticketed. Or as Mike Garafalo tweeted at me, the “Ferarri’s” (star players) get all the attention from the cops but the “Kia’s” (average players) are ignored when it comes to getting pulled over.

MMMD 2: Everyone will play in SB51, but how well?

Everyone gets healthy in the two weeks before Super Bowl. Fortunately, both the Falcons and Patriots are relatively injury free.

The Falcons have no one listed on the game status injury report. Julio Jones is still dealing with his turf toe and is said to have two ligament injuries and a mid foot issue. This is the same foot that has had two previous 5th metatarsal fracture surgeries. I do not think the extra week will allow Jones a full recovery. Despite a monster Conference Championship game, don’t expect a repeat performance. Center Alex Mack, by video, suffered a high ankle sprain and finished the NFC title game but has now missed considerable practice. No doubt he will strap it up for the big game.

Of course the Patriots will miss Gronk (on IR for back surgery) but everyone else should play. Nate Ebner is on pace to be cleared from concussion and may accomplish an unprecedented feat. In the last six months he will have played in the Rio Olympics (for USA rugby) and now a Super Bowl. All of his many teammates listed as “questionable” should be available as well.

It is the Super Bowl. Everyone will be available.

MMMD 3: Teddy Bridgewater not back for 2017?

A small uproar was created when it was reported that the Vikings QB would miss next season. This is a case of don’t shoot the messenger. Jason Cole correctly quotes the typical recovery time from a knee dislocation, where multiple ligaments are torn, to be a year and a half. When NaVorro Bowman torn his ACL and MCL, he missed the following season and still struggled after that. There is optimism for Jaylon Smith after his multi-ligament knee injury but he is still wearing an AFO indicating a nerve problem. The point is that all knee dislocation/subluxation injuries are far harder to return from than the average ACL tear.

There is no guarantee for 2017 for Bridgewater. Typically there is always offseason injury optimism but head coach Mike Zimmer has said he does not have a timeline for return. After all, did the Vikings trade for Sam Bradford just for one season, or were they also buying insurance for the next year and beyond?

MMMD 4: League injury data

The annual NFL injury data was released early instead of at Super Bowl week. The league data showed concussions remained essentially the same over a five-year span with 244 total this past season. ACL tears remained constant over the last five years with just under two per team as the average. MCL tears also were similar, averaging just under five per club. With the new touchback rule, there was not a big statistical change on kick-off related injuries. If anything, knee injuries increased. Thursday games continue to have fewer injuries than Sunday games.

MMMD 5: Three unusual situations

Cyrus Kuoandjio had hip surgery after a fall at home. Details were not released but the implication is a potential hip fracture. That is not unusual for grandma, but extremely unusual for a young healthy NFL player. We will need to wait to hear more details on whether there is some underlying pathology or if this truly was a fluke. Dexter McCluster was signed by the Chargers and had a previous forearm fracture and re-broke it with an at home luggage incident.

Josh Doctson is still dealing with his Achilles tendonitis. I am sure the Redskins medical staff has tried all sorts of conservative care, modalities and likely PRP/stem cells. If he doesn’t turn the corner soon, surgery to debride the Achilles may become an option.

Ryan Tannenhill finally had surgery ruled out this week. He injured his ACL and MCL but only recently determined that no ACL reconstruction was needed. There are reports of him flying to Germany for treatment despite PRP and stem cells being legal and routinely used in the US. Players will literally go to the ends of the earth if there is a chance for something better.

MMMD 6: Hardest part of retirement

Steve Smith, Sr. on the “Know Them From Adam” podcast talked about one of the hardest adjustments to post-NFL life. He singled out medical care. Indeed now he will need a new set of doctors. All player’s (and sometimes family) needs are met by the team doctors. Most times, the physicians make “house calls” and come to the facility. There are even preferential appointment times for the dentist. Indeed, life after football involves getting to know what a doctor’s waiting room is for.

MMMD 7: ProFootballDoc

I did not watch the Pro Bowl and thankfully there are rarely injuries in that all-star game. Having covered two of these exhibitions, anyone with the slightest of medical conditions is pulled for safety. No injury analysis this week and thus the 95.1% accuracy rate stands.

I am in Houston this week for Super Bowl and the media activities. I hope there will not be a need, but will be at the big game to provide live injury analysis from NRG stadium.

Dr. David Chao

Two decades of NFL team physician experience including two Super Bowls and two Pro Bowls. Providing unique perspective to injuries and the NFL sideline/locker room. Successful orthopedic surgery and sports medicine practice in Southern California.

Read More 1513 Words

Monday Morning MD: History repeats itself

Another AFC Championship game in Foxboro. Another opposing star running back is injured early and sits dejected on the sidelines with an oversized jacket to stay warm. The Patriots advance to another Super Bowl.

When Le’Veon Bell left just after the start of the game with a groin injury, it reminded me of LaDainian Tomlinson’s

Another AFC Championship game in Foxboro. Another opposing star running back is injured early and sits dejected on the sidelines with an oversized jacket to stay warm. The Patriots advance to another Super Bowl.

When Le’Veon Bell left just after the start of the game with a groin injury, it reminded me of LaDainian Tomlinson’s early exit with MCL injury. Both came into the game with their injuries but could not continue. Both sat helplessly trying just to stay warm as their teams lost to the host Patriots. Both incidents just had the same look and feel.

Injuries are always a big part of the game. Would the Steelers been able to hang tight with the Patriots if Bell stayed healthy? Would the Chargers have prevailed in 2008 if LT would have been healthy?

A groin injury is debilitating for a running back. Not only does it make it hard to cut, it robs a player of his burst. The cold didn’t make it any easier. Bell could have limped through his game like LT could have hobbled through his, but clearly it was the better move in both circumstances to play their capable back-ups.

Is it just luck for the Patriots that their path to the Super Bowl was made easier by the opposing team’s key injury? Certainly, to some extent New England makes it’s own luck by having the best record in the NFL.

The only thing these Patriots have in common with the 2008 team is QB Tom Brady and K Stephen Gostkowski, plus of course the head coach. In fact, there are 30 new players out of the 53 since the last Super Bowl victory just two years ago. We shall see if it will yield the same results as the Falcons seem to be a formidable opponent.

I provided medical coverage for two Super Bowls but my team never made it to the big game in my almost two decades. The Patriots had a new team doctor when they won it all in 2015. Again they have a first time team doctor this year. Will history repeat itself?

MMMD 1: Everyone plays

When it comes to the Conference Championship games, no one wants to miss the chance to help their team get to the Super Bowl. After all, next comes an extra week of rest before the big game or an offseason of rest. This is what drove Philip Rivers to play fresh off a knee scope and with a torn ACL in 2008.

All three injured Packers wide receivers (Jordy Nelson, Davante Adams and Geronimo Allison) played. Also Morgan Burnett (quad) and Christine Michael (back) suited up as well.

It was obvious that James Harrison would play and so did his flu-ridden teammates. I doubt a 3am wake up had much effect for an evening kickoff. Besides, in my experience, players don’t get up to leave their rooms with a fire alarm without team security personally performing the evacuation.

MMMD 2: Everyone will be ready for SB51

Barring any surprises, it should be a healthy game in Houston. The additional week before the big game should allow all players to be near top form.

Julio Jones with his turf toe/foot issues will be a player to watch but I anticipate he will be fine. Alex Mack finished the game with his ankle spatted and should be in good shape in two weeks.

Martellus Bennett will need ankle surgery with his bone chips/fracture but that should be a minimal issue. Chris Hogan had a big game despite coming in with quad injury and then having hamstring issues where the two weeks will help here.

Here is hoping both squads remain at full strength and the better team wins.

MMMD 3: How did Jordy Nelson play with multiple broken ribs?

When it was reported that the Packers WR was on the second bus on Sunday, that confirmed to me he would play. Players that are game-time decisions, arrive early on the first bus to test the injury out. Ones that know they won’t play take the 3rd bus.

The much talked about Kevlar vest is not the main reason Nelson could play. Any protection doesn’t eliminate the pain of twisting, reaching, blocking or even deep breaths. Often rib blocks are utilized where the intercostal nerves are numbed with injections. This allows a player to move without pain and is an entirely legal form of medication in the NFL. Pain pills are used less frequently than people think, as a player’s mind needs to be clear to play this complex game.

MMMD 4: Seahawks won’t be penalized

Pete Carroll said Richard Sherman had a “significant” MCL but he was never on an injury report. This led many to expect a Seahawk penalty to come.

I don’t think it will happen. Teams are not required to report all injuries. Trust me that every team’s injury list is longer than the one that is published.

Only significant injuries are required to be reported. This is where the semantics come into play and Pete Carroll is obviously not a physician.

Medically, it is impossible for any CB to play with a significant MCL injury. Of course you can argue that any mild MCL is a significant issue for a defensive back. However, if the MCL was medically graded as mild (even though the coach described it as significant), that will be the loophole that allows the Seahawks to escape league penalties.

MMMD 5: Zach Orr gets lucky

Unfortunately the Ravens budding star linebacker was forced to medically retire from football. In reality, Orr is quite lucky. He has a dangerous congenital C1 condition that was discovered after a routine work up for a stinger.

He had unknowingly played his entire career with the potentially deadly problem. One wrong hit and a C1 problem could easily be fatal and there is no reason to take chances.

In the end, Orr is lucky to have discovered the issue and that he didn’t play one play too many. That is the bright side of this unfortunate situation.

MMMD 6: Pro Bowl replacement season

This is the annual ritual where players tap out due to injury. The Pro Bowl game is always a game of musical chairs to the point that it is hard to keep up.

Alex Smith and Dustin Colquitt are now in. Jadeveon Clowney, among others, is out. With the game now the week before the Super Bowl, Conference Championship winners will all be out, while many of the losers will choose not to attend.

Also this week, many offseason surgeries were announced. Andrew Luck had a clean up throwing shoulder procedure. Meanwhile, Sammy Watkins finally had his much anticipated second foot surgery.

MMMD 7: ProFootballDoc scorecard

Sammy Watkins finally had the second predicted foot surgery. Ladarius Green missed as expected. James Harrison, Jordy Nelson, Davante Adams, Morgan Burnett, Julio Jones, Chris Hogan and Martellus Bennett all played as expected. Le’Veon Bell did not return. Alex Mack did injury his left ankle.

I was wrong in too hastily opining on T.J. Lang’s injury with only one view.

This slightly lowers the 203-10 (95.3%) record to 214-11 (95.1%).

Dr. David Chao

Two decades of NFL team physician experience including two Super Bowls and two Pro Bowls. Providing unique perspective to injuries and the NFL sideline/locker room. Successful orthopedic surgery and sports medicine practice in Southern California.

Read More 1139 Words

Monday Morning MD: Who is healthy for the Championship Games?

Not all ACL surgeries go smoothly. Even ones done by renowned orthopedic surgeons can go wrong.

After tearing up his knee last year, Dion Lewis flew to seek out who he thought was the best to perform the procedure but still had a serious complication. After his initial surgery, his kneecap developed a fracture from

Not all ACL surgeries go smoothly. Even ones done by renowned orthopedic surgeons can go wrong.

After tearing up his knee last year, Dion Lewis flew to seek out who he thought was the best to perform the procedure but still had a serious complication. After his initial surgery, his kneecap developed a fracture from where the ACL graft was taken. He needed a second surgery with screws in his patella and missed a majority of this season.

The Divisional Round was his come back party. Lewis triumphantly scored three touchdowns in three different ways: receiving, rushing and special teams. He was a passing TD away from a historic cycle.

At the start of the season with Lewis missing, there were many questions why the Patriots could not get their star RB on the field. As I have always said, the truth comes out eventually. In fact, given the surgical complication, Lewis has made a tremendously quick recovery.

Medical staffs and especially team physicians are quick to get the blame. Their names are rarely mentioned when credit is due. When a second opinion doctor performs the surgery, their name is often announced with the obligatory proclamation that “surgery was successful”. When the team doctor does it, it is usually done in anonymity. In many ways the medical team is like offensive lineman or long snappers. Their names are often mentioned with blame but rarely with kudos.

I am glad this story has a happy ending but it serves a reminder that there is always risk in surgery and despite everyone thinking that return from ACL surgery is routine, there are definite pitfalls along the way.

Here are how the teams look from a health perspective headed into the Championship Games as well as the medical rundown.

MMMD 1: Packers injury outlook

The Jordy Nelson good news is that he has no organ damage, did travel to the game, and was on the sidelines. The bad news is he was moving very gingerly and I saw him clutching his ribs as he congratulated players on the first touchdown. Reports also said his current goal was to breathe normally again. With a week to go there is a chance, but far from a guarantee, that Nelson would play. If Green Bay gets to the Super Bowl, he would have an excellent chance of playing.

Morgan Burnett appeared to have a quad contusion. If the Packers can control swelling and maintain flexibility, he has a chance to play next week.

By video, David Bakhtiari suffered a mild right knee MCL sprain. He returned after being taped/braced. He should be fine moving straight ahead but likely will have some limitations side to side.

Slow motion showed DeVante Adams with a mild left high ankle sprain. He was taped and returned. Careful here with the swelling. I would expect a post-game boot and some missed practice but that he would try to go next week.

LaDarius Gunter appeared to have the wind knocked out of him and finished the game. I don’t seen any issues with him being 100%,

MMMD 2: Falcons injury outlook

Julio Jones left with a foot injury late in the game. The presumption is a re-aggravation of his turf toe. His coach said he could have continued but was pulled for the score. Jones will likely be limited in practice this week. This bears watching but the hope is Jones will be just fine.

Adrian Clayborn was reported to tear his biceps tendon at he elbow. Normally that is a season-ending injury that requires surgery. If Clayborn and the Falcons want to pull out all stops, he could try to play and have surgery after the season. It would be hard due to pain/swelling to play in the Championship game but he could play with some flexion and supination weakness in his elbow for the Super Bowl. Before you say this is far-fetched, ask Terrell Suggs. He played thru the second half of this season with a biceps tear.

MMMD 3: Patriots injury outlook

Chris Hogan appeared to have a thigh bruise and with good medical care should be good to go for the Championship Game.

Martellus Bennett survived a hyper-extension injury scare to finish the game and should be healthy.

Danny Ammendola continues his recovery from a high ankle sprain and another week should improve that.

MMMD 4: Steelers healthy

Big Ben is fine. The ankle scare when he was seen with a boot post-game last week is long behind us. As expected it was purely precautionary and he played and moved well.

Hope no injury news pops up as sometimes happens, but right now the big news in Pittsburgh is all about Antonio Brown’s social medial locker room post.

MMMD 5: Head coach younger than player

The Rams have a very young team but new head coach Sean McVay (age 30) is still younger than one player on his roster and the same age as two others. I am not sure what the NFL precedent is for this.

I don’t think this will be an issue. In my first eight years as a NFL team physician, there was at least one player on the team younger than me. That was an oddity but never an issue other than perhaps locker room banter.

MMMD 6: Will medical staff move with the Chargers?

Typically, the athletic training staff moves with the club. The doctors usually do not. NFL physicians all have full-time practices outside of the team that account for the majority of their income. With the move to Los Angeles, the UCSD medical sponsorship and the local team physicians will certainly change.

MMMD 7: Injury rundown

Chief WR Chris Conley took a vicious penalized hit to the head, yet returned to the game. Another example of how concussions cannot be judged by video. By the eye test, he certainly should have been removed from the game but the independent doctor allowed his return after examination.

Seattle CB DeShawn Shead likely tore his ACL. Unfortunately, that means surgery and starting next season on PUP.

Seahawk Germain Ifedi by video suffered a left high ankle sprain but will have plenty of time to recover for the offseason program

Jimmy Graham has made everyone forget about his patella tendon rupture playing very well at season end.

Mike Zimmer is just being honest on Bridgewater when he says “We don’t know when Teddy will be back”. Video posts show progress in rehab but he is a long way from a full return. A knee dislocation is among the severest of injuries.

MMMD extra: ProFootballDoc scorecard

I was on vacation with the family so I did not have my usual video capabilities in the hotel but thanks to the extra cameras and playoff coverage, many great replays were shown allowing me to still provide some input.

Davonte Adams returned from left high ankle sprain. David Bakhtiari returned from a mild MCL sprain. LaDarius Gunter avoided injury from a bad looking hit. DeShawn Shead appears to have torn his ACL.

C.J. Prosise did not play as expected and neither did Jordy Nelson. Big Ben’s foot/ankle was a non-issue. Blake Martinez was limited with his MCL.

This improves the 203-10 (95.3%) record to 211-10 (95.5%)

Dr. David Chao

Two decades of NFL team physician experience including two Super Bowls and two Pro Bowls. Providing unique perspective to injuries and the NFL sideline/locker room. Successful orthopedic surgery and sports medicine practice in Southern California.

Read More 1146 Words

End of content

No more pages to load