Betting

Rhode Island Inches Closer to Making Sports Betting Legal

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Rhode Island’s Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday voted in favor of S7200, a sweeping appropriations bill that includes a 15-page section that calls for legal RI sports betting. The bill

The post Rhode Island Inches Closer to Making Sports Betting Legal appeared first on SportsHandle.

Rhode Island’s Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday voted in favor of S7200, a sweeping appropriations bill that includes a 15-page section that calls for legal RI sports betting. The bill passed the House, 66-7, late Friday and after the nod of approval from the Finance Committee, will now move on to the full Senate floor for a vote later this week. The bill is not currently on the Senate calendar for today or Wednesday.

It’s likely that the bill will pass the Senate with no problem, and that Governor Gina Raimondo will sign it into law. Raimondo has a $23.5 million line item in her upcoming budget earmarked as revenue from sports betting.

The bill allows for sports betting at Rhode Island’s two casinos, Twin River and Tiverton, both tribal-owned gaming facilities. The state’s lottery would regulate sports betting.

Rhode Island Poised to Become Second State in Post-PASPA Era to Pass New Legislation That Legalizes Sports Betting.

Should the bill sail through the Senate, and when Raimondo signs it, Rhode Island will become the second state since the Supreme Court struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act on May 14 to pass a sports betting law. New Jersey, which accepted its first bet at Monmouth Park on June 14 was the first. Delaware, which did not need to pass new laws, was the first state to accept sports bets in the post-PASPA era when it did so beginning June 5.

The Rhode Island bill does have a few peculiarities – in particular, it expressly forbids the payment of an “integrity fee” or “royalty,” which the professional leagues have been lobbying for; it calls for the cities of Lincoln and Tiverton, home of the two casinos, to be paid $100,000 per year for “hosting” sports betting; and gaming operators will be responsible for paying for their own integrity monitoring.

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The Analyst: Basic Guide for Monitoring a Sportsbook

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As sport betting fever continues to roll through the country with many a state legislature adopting or considering the adoption of laws and regulations to permit sports wagering, regulators and enforcement

The post The Analyst: Basic Guide for Monitoring a Sportsbook appeared first on SportsHandle.

As sport betting fever continues to roll through the country with many a state legislature adopting or considering the adoption of laws and regulations to permit sports wagering, regulators and enforcement agents are starting to question what they need to do to audit and monitor sports betting operations.

Under that motivation, a few former associates of mine who moved to the regulatory side of the gaming business separately called and asked similar questions:

What are the most common problems you have seen in sportsbook operations? What weaknesses are there in the control of book operations? Can a sportsbook be cheated?

Please click here to read the remainder of the article at Gaming Today.

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The latest on sports betting legislation and regulation The latest sports betting podcast ‘The Hedge’ from Jimmy Shapiro

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Checking In On West Virginia’s Sports Betting Plans and Launch

The post Checking In On West Virginia’s Sports Betting Plans and Launch appeared first on SportsHandle.

Last we checked in on West Virginia sports betting, Governor Jim Justice forced a meeting between professional and collegiate sports league and team representatives, lawmakers, lobbyists and an intern on a power trip.

The post Checking In On West Virginia’s Sports Betting Plans and Launch appeared first on SportsHandle.

Last we checked in on West Virginia sports betting, Governor Jim Justice forced a meeting between professional and collegiate sports league and team representatives, lawmakers, lobbyists and an intern on a power trip. It was quite a show.

But the real work is underway as the West Virginia Lottery is polishing rules and regulations for legal WV sports betting, as permitted by the West Virginia Lottery Sports Wagering Act that passed in March (SB 415).

To get some insight on where the Lottery is at with respect to those rules, and when West Virginians and neighbors can head to a facility to make a wager, Sports Handle caught up with General Counsel for Lottery, Danielle Boyd, Esq. (Note: this interview has been lightly edited for clarity and brevity.)

WV Sports Betting Rules and Regulations Almost Complete, Lottery General Counsel Says Casinos Should Be Ready For Football Season.

West Virginia Sports Betting Bill SB 415 Passes Senate; Measure Will Head to the House of Delegates for a Vote Soon
Hollywood Casino at Charles Town Races in West Virginia

Sports Handle (SH): How are things coming along for the West Virginia Lottery and the plan to roll out sports betting?

Danielle Boyd (DB): We’re progressing here pretty well. Actually we had our last meeting with the casinos two weeks ago today. We hashed out the “priority issues” and got everybody’s feedback. Then we sent out a request for comment and writing, giving the casinos the opportunity to formally submit any points they wanted to make, or any policy considerations that they wanted us to have when making our final decisions.

We got those responses last week and we’ve reviewed them and we are in the process of compiling our legislative rules, which will be granted emergency status. We are hoping to have those [on Tuesday] if possible, but in the next couple days for sure.

SH:  Are all five of the casino/racetrack properties pretty much at the same place? Might one or some begin operating sooner than others?

DB:  It’s unclear at this time and it think that any specifics about where those properties stand would probably be best addressed my John Cavacini, president of the West Virginia Racing and Gaming Association. But our goal is still to have everybody up and running by football season.

SH:  Including college football as well, so roughly late August?

DB:  September 1 at the very latest.

SH:  What have been the top challenges for and your team at the going through this process of implementing new regulations?

DB: It’s a different animal than anything that we’ve dealt with before and so knowing that, we’ve tried to surround ourselves with the best and the brightest consultants. One of the challenges has been making sure that we have the legislative rules we need, but avoiding ones we don’t. So we’ll need some flexibility.

We do have “emergency status” until early December as far as these legislative rules are concerned. So we can change them, we can add to them if we need to until December, but after that point, they would have to go through the legislative rule making process. 

SH: Can you explain some of the new technologies that you guys are implementing and the mobile element for sports betting?

DB:  Sure. This is our first dip in the pool of mobile or online. Currently, we do not have iGaming in West Virginia and we haven’t shifted to doing online sales for our traditional products yet. We’re hoping all that will come in the near future, but this is a new venture for us into this area of online and mobile, so we’re learning the different technologies and system integrations. We certainly want to make sure that we have the data and the access and the reportings to ensure that we can properly regulate the sports betting at all five casinos.

SH:  Will mobile be available for patrons immediately or will there be a 30- or however many day window before casinos can offer that?

DB: Our goal is to ultimately offer both those products and roll them out at the same time. But if it would come to a point where land-based operations were ready to launch and mobile was not, that would be a consideration that we would make. I think it’s too early for us to tell at this point, but certainly we want to make sure that we’re not hindering the casinos in getting up and running with whatever they can offer, as soon as they can offer it, but the goal is that both of the land based and mobile or online would launch at the same time.

SH:  Can you give any insights into any physical spaces or sports betting lounges that may be getting built?

DB: All five of the properties are planning to build or are getting ready to begin construction of sportsbook lounges on their property. As for the sizes of those, I don’t know any specifics at this point but that will be something that will be in the works and hopefully construction will be up and running pretty quickly. 

We’re also going allow them to construct temporary facilities so that if their lounges aren’t quite ready for when they can begin accepting wagers by mid-August, we’ll go ahead and approve temporary specifications that they can begin offering sports betting on premises.

SH:  As far as the re-negotiation of the law and that meeting that occurred in May,  has has that ship sailed or is there still pressure to bring parties back to the table?

DB:  As far as we’re aware, the negotiations between the casinos and the will continue but it will not be at a state level. It will be on working on exchanging value for value through a commercial agreement between the two parties.

[A Timeline of the Leagues’ Fight For A Sports Betting ‘Integrity Fee’]

SH:  Anything you’d like to add as far as what’s going on and what patrons can expect and the roll out in general?

DB:  We’re really excited about the opportunity to start accepting wagers as soon as possible. We’re excited to see West Virginia out in front for once and we’re hoping to really capitalize on the knowledge and experience of the partners that we’re working with both at the casino level and also the consultants we’ve brought here to West Virginia to make sure we get the best model and the best structure in place. We’re excited for everybody to capitalize on the revenue opportunities and also so that we can drive traffic into the state and our facilities.

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The latest on sports betting legislation and regulation The latest sports betting podcast ‘The Hedge’ from Jimmy Shapiro

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Oregon Lottery Prepping Mobile App, With Mobile Sports Betting to Follow

The post Oregon Lottery Prepping Mobile App, With Mobile Sports Betting to Follow appeared first on SportsHandle.

The Oregon Lottery is laying the groundwork to roll out Oregon sports betting with mobile/online functionality. The first iteration of the app, which will allow players to see if they hold a winning lottery

The post Oregon Lottery Prepping Mobile App, With Mobile Sports Betting to Follow appeared first on SportsHandle.

The Oregon Lottery is laying the groundwork to roll out Oregon sports betting with mobile/online functionality. The first iteration of the app, which will allow players to see if they hold a winning lottery ticket, is planned for later this summer.

“The fact of the matter is that when our app launches, there won’t be any ability to buy any of our products,” Oregon Lottery Senior Public Affairs Officer Chuck Baumann told Sports Handle Monday.  “It will simply be that players will have ability to check tickets to see if they are winners, as well as get other information, like jackpot alerts, a look at where (lottery) money goes, and there will be a retailer finder. At some point in time, and we’re not sure what that’s going to look like, we will offer games and some sort of sports betting.”

Oregon is one of four states that was grandfathered in under the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, which prohibited sports betting in most states. The Supreme Court struck down the act on May 14, and Oregon already has language on the books that would allow for sports betting, so no new legislation needs to be passed before the state can offer sports betting.

The Oregon Lottery Will Roll Out a Mobile App Later This Summer, and Eventually Plans to Have Legal Mobile OR Sports Betting.

Baumann was careful to say that the timetable, even for the initial version of the app, is fluid, though he expects it to be available this summer. Sports betting and other features will follow in phases, though Baumann said exactly what the app will look like – whether it will have a dropdown menu or if patrons will click through icons – isn’t settled yet. The immediate goal is to get the first version of the app into the hands of the public.

Oregon Lottery

Oregon is no novice when it comes to gambling – or to being on the cutting edge of gambling. The state has nine tribal casinos, a horse racetrack and 11 OTB locations. In addition, the state also has a summer weekend horse racing circuit and is one of a handful of states that has a “hub” system to accept wagers on horse and dog racing from out-of-state bettors.

Oregon Has 9 Tribal Casinos, All of Which Will Be Able to Offer Legal OR Mobile Sports Betting if the Lottery Does, According to a Lottery Spokesman.

Those nine tribal casinos are very much on the lottery’s mind – as are state lawmakers and the governor – as it moves forward with its new app. As is the case in other states, the tribal casinos are located on federal land and are governed by the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, not state law. But there is a pact between the state and the tribes in place, which lays a framework for taxation and other issues.

[Also See: Mailbag Mythbusting: The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA) and Sports Betting]

“The pact that the state has with the tribal casinos is that any games that the state lottery offers, they can offer,” Baumann said. “So, if we can all work together … that would be better.”

As the lottery prepares to move forward with its app, it’s likely that state lawmakers will also get involved in the process, as Oregon does not currently have a regulatory framework or tax hierarchy in place for mobile gaming or sports betting.

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The latest on sports betting legislation and regulation The latest sports betting podcast ‘The Hedge’ from Jimmy Shapiro

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Mailbag Mythbusting: The Illegal Gambling Businesses Act and Sports Betting

The post Mailbag Mythbusting: The Illegal Gambling Businesses Act and Sports Betting appeared first on SportsHandle.

This is the sixth in a series of stories for Sports Handle discussing various federal statutes that in one way or another remain relevant to the expansion of legalized sports betting

The post Mailbag Mythbusting: The Illegal Gambling Businesses Act and Sports Betting appeared first on SportsHandle.

This is the sixth in a series of stories for Sports Handle discussing various federal statutes that in one way or another remain relevant to the expansion of legalized sports betting after the fall of the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA). The first two parts on the Wire Act are available here and here. The next two on UIGEA are here and here and you can read about IGRA here. This information is provided for information and entertainment purposes only. Nothing contained in this series constitutes legal advice.

Jamie from Seattle, Washington asks: What is the Illegal Gambling Businesses Act? Is it the same thing as the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act? Is every gambling operation within the scope of the statute?

Answer:

The Illegal Gambling Businesses Act (IGBA), or the Prohibition of Illegal Gambling Businesses as it is known in the U.S. Code (18 U.S.C. § 1955), is a Federal statute that was passed in 1970, as part of an omnibus crime bill called the Organized Crime Control Act. Representative Dante Fascell of Florida opened a 1970 hearing by sharing his views on the necessity of the bill:

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the most successful growth industry in the United States–organized crime. For five decades this country and its people have been victimized by a nationwide crime confederation bent on carrying on a host of illegal ventures, time vital underpinning of which is taking of vast sums of money from people, the corruption of the Private sector and the taking over of private enterprise.

Following a report several years earlier, citing a lack of leadership and poor coordination for the failure to curb organized crime, various bills were assembled to provide the Federal government with additional law enforcement power. A year earlier, former Attorney General Will Wilson testified that a powerful Federal tool was necessary because of a connection between illegal gambling businesses and corruption of local law enforcement.

Wilson noted that in one instance the IRS went to a major city in the South to conduct an investigation and came back empty-handed when it was discovered that nearly the entire Vice task force had been on the take from organized crime and had tipped off the bookmakers before the IRS showed up.

The IGBA is distinct from the RICO Act, but have similarities. First, both the IGBA and RICO were passed in 1970, and were intended to give the Federal government tools for targeting interstate (international, as well) criminal organizations, which local law enforcement was either unwilling or unable to target themselves. Secondly, both statutes are implicated by gambling offenses. There are 35 offenses that can trigger RICO, one of which is a predicate gambling offense such as a violation of the IGBA. While the two statutes are related they are in fact distinct.

Not every gambling operation is within the scope of the IGBA. In fact, the IGBA has a very distinct set of requirements, which define when a gambling operation is within the definitional requirement of the statute:

  1. A predicate violation of state law, which means the gambling operation needs to be illegal in the place it is being conducted.
  2. It involves five or more people in the operation and management of the business, and
  3. Is in near continuous operation for 30 days or has gross revenue in excess of $2,000 on any particular day.

Marco from Butte, Montana asks: Is it true that the Illegal Gambling Businesses Act is different in different states?

Answer:

This is somewhat true. While the text of the statute does not change, because the IGBA requires a predicate violation of state law, the statute technically can have different applications in different states.

For example, consider the Texas’s Attorney General’s opinion on daily fantasy sports being an illegal form of gambling under Texas law (this assumes a court upholds the Attorney General’s opinion), if the other two elements of the statute are satisfied (number of people and operation volume, and duration) a daily fantasy company operating in Texas may invoke the statute.

Contrast this with Rhode Island, where the Attorney General issued an opinion that daily fantasy contests do not violate the state’s laws (again, assuming a court upheld the opinion). As the IGBA requires a predicate state law violation, the conduct that is illegal and implicates the IGBA would not trigger the statute if the same conduct occurred in Rhode Island because there is no predicate violation of state law.


Thomas from Terre Haute, Indiana asks: Texas Hold ‘em is a game of skill, so why is there a Federal court decision that convicted someone for violating the IGBA when they were playing a skill game?

Answer:

If  the case you are referencing is United States v. DiCristina, DiCristina ran a poker club in the back of a warehouse on Staten Island. The games of no limit Hold ‘em were played approximately twice a month, and each pot had a five percent rake. DiCristina argued that poker is not house-banked (which does not concern this analysis) and that skill predominates over chance in poker, and therefore is not an illegal type of gambling under the IGBA.

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals looked to the plain language of the statute to conclude that even though poker did not appear in an enumerated list of games that the IGBA lists, Texas Hold ’em still implicated the statute because the game was illegal under New York law. It was also immaterial that skill predominates over chance in Hold ’em because New York applies a different test, the Material Element test, which only requires that chance be a material element of an activity to trigger the statute.

In the interest of clearing up any ambiguity about whether games of skill can still constitute illegal gambling, they can. In addition to the fact that sports betting may be skill based The IGBA specifically lists bookmaking and pool-selling as activities the statute was intended to be applied against.


Mark from St. Louis, Missouri asks: I am not a constitutional law expert, but I thought that the Federal government could only regulate things that take place between states, the IGBA sounds like it is dealing with local issues, how is that allowed?

Answer:

Mark, this is a fantastic question. You are referencing the commerce clause, which is one of three primary means that Congress uses to regulate conduct (the taxing power and the spending power are the other two).

The commerce clause also gives the Federal government the ability to regulate commerce between the states, while allowing the Feds the ability to: (1) regulate the channels of interstate commerce; (2) “Congress has authority to regulate and protect the instrumentalities of interstate commerce, and persons or things in interstate commerce”; and (3) “Congress has the power to regulate activities that substantially affect interstate commerce,” this according to the Supreme Court, from the 2005 case Gonzales v. Raich. This is an incredibly expansive power, one that has been found to allow the Federal government the ability to do things like pass the IGBA, because organized crime has been found to have a substantial effect on interstate commerce.


Sandra from Little Rock, Arkansas asks: Who counts in the five-person requirement? People have to be instrumental to the operation for them to count, right?

Answer:

This assumption is not entirely correct. The IGBA’s five-person prong has been interpreted very broadly, so as to include a variety of people involved in the business beyond the bettors themselves. In fact, casual bettors are not generally thought to be within the scope of the statute. In United States v. Thomas, the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals highlighted the scope of who is incorporated as counting in the five person requirement by noting the list provided in section ‘C’ of the statute which states:

“If five or more persons conduct, finance, manage, supervise, direct, or own all or part of a gambling business and such business operates for two or more successive days, then, for the purpose of obtaining warrants for arrests, interceptions, and other searches and seizures, probable cause that the business receives gross revenue in excess of $2,000 in any single day shall be deemed to have been established.”

The Eighth Circuit would go further in a case five years later elaborating the scope of the five person requirement in noting that “[t]he scope of section 1955 is broad and excludes only customers of the business. The jurisdictional five persons may include unindicted and unnamed persons as well.”

Phillip from Alexandria, Virginia asks: Can you point me in the direction of some additional resources?

Answer:

Absolutely. One excellent contribution is from Kaitlyn Dunphy titled: Following Suit With the Second Circuit: Defining Gambling in the Illegal Gambling Business Act.

Stay tuned for “Kitchen Sink” with the remainder of the federal laws of note. 

John T. Holden J.D. / Ph.D. is an Academic. His research focuses on policy issues surrounding sports corruption. John is on twitter @johnsportslaw.

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The latest on sports betting legislation and regulation The latest sports betting podcast ‘The Hedge’ from Jimmy Shapiro

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New Jersey Allows Esports Betting With massive restriction

When New Jersey became the first state to allow sports betting after the Supreme Court decision, they initially said there was no betting on "high school sports events, electronic sports, and competitive video games." 

A few days later - after an outcry from the esports community - they amended the law saying that betting on

When New Jersey became the first state to allow sports betting after the Supreme Court decision, they initially said there was no betting on “high school sports events, electronic sports, and competitive video games.” 

A few days later – after an outcry from the esports community – they amended the law saying that betting on esports events is allowed, so long as every participant in the tournament is 18 or older.

In traditional sports that isn’t a problem. Very few players in any sport have the ability to compete at the highest level before being able to vote. In esports, without a physical requirement, many people as young as 13 have been successful in their game. Players like Scrub Killa in Rocket League and Mongraal in Fortnite have been able to compete at that young age.

Still, they are the exception not the rule. But, because of players like them, the entry into the most popular esports leagues and events is often below that age threshold. For example, League of Legends’ LCS is 17, Rocket League’s RLCS is 15.

DOTA 2’s The International, which boasts the highest prize pool in esports, has no age requirement either. Epic Games hasn’t released competitive details for Fortnite but with the games massive popularity in teens, 18 would prevent a lot of the player base from competing.

Their are two main third-party tournament organizers in esports, Dreamhack and ESL. Dreamhack has no minimum age requirement, so it’s out.

So what does that leave? ESL is still in, so long as the game is rated for 18+. That means first person shooter’s like CS:GO and Rainbow Six: Siege should be good.

In terms of leagues that fit the age requirement, there are three big ones in America. The Overwatch League which boasts the highest franchise fees in esports at $20 million is good – just don’t bet on Shanghai. The Call of Duty World League which is a favorite of many NFL players and the NBA 2K League are both eligible as well.

Betting on esports is a huge business with people already wagering in-game items on games. There will be demand and betting could be the catalyst that raises the age requirement to become a pro in other titles.

Mitch Reames – The intersection of the NFL and esports

After graduating from the University of Oregon’s Journalism program, Mitch began writing about esports for SportTechie.

He identified the potential for content serving fans of both sports and esports, and will be focusing on that fan sector in his writing for NFP.

When he’s not playing Fortnite, Rocket League or Hearthstone, Mitch is rooting on the LA Rams, Oregon Ducks and his fantasy team.

Follow him on Twitter @Mitch_Reames

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Rhode Island Takes 1st Step to Legal Sports Betting

The post Rhode Island Takes 1st Step to Legal Sports Betting appeared first on SportsHandle.

Late Friday night, the Rhode Island General Assembly overwhelmingly approved an appropriations bill that includes making sports betting legal in the state. The General Assembly voted, 66-7, to approve the measure, albeit about

The post Rhode Island Takes 1st Step to Legal Sports Betting appeared first on SportsHandle.

Late Friday night, the Rhode Island General Assembly overwhelmingly approved an appropriations bill that includes making sports betting legal in the state. The General Assembly voted, 66-7, to approve the measure, albeit about seven hours later than the vote was first scheduled. The vote marks the first step in what will likely be a fairly streamlined process to get Rhode Island sports betting online. The Senate is expected to pass the appropriations bill next week and then Governor Gina Raimondo will sign off on it. Raimondo has $23.5 million in sports betting revenue in her budget.

Rhode Island becomes the second state since the Supreme Court struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act on May 14 to pass legal sports betting. New Jersey was the first. It did so on June 11 and was accepting sports bets three days later. Delaware, which did not need to pass new legislation post-PASPA, was the first state outside of Nevada to begin accepting legal sports bets when it did so on June 8.

Rhode Island has two tribal-owned casinos, Twin River and Tiverton. According to the Associated Press, Rhode Island lawmakers “finalized the deal with the casinos and the betting system’s operator Friday before budget deliberations began.”

The State of Rhode island Will Receive 51 Percent of Sports Betting Revenue, Should RI Sports Betting Be Made Legal. 

The bill calls for a five-year deal under which the company International Gaming Technology will be the operator at both casinos. Sports betting revenue will be disbursed as such: 51 percent to the state, 32 percent to IGT and 17 percent to Twin River, which owns and manages both casinos. In addition, the towns of Lincoln and Tiverton, where the casinos are located, will get a $100,000 annual fee for being “host communities.”

Rhode Island becomes the latest state to shun the professional sports leagues. The bill does not include the “integrity fee” that the leagues have been lobbying for, and, in fact, expressly forbids the payment of any fee at all to the professional leagues.

“It was a collaborative effort with the state coming together to do one thing … to get the best possible deal for the taxpayers,” House Majority Leader Joe Shekarchi, told WPRI immediately after the vote. “I’m very proud of the House’s involvement in this.”

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Sports betting news, business and stories Las Vegas live odds
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More Wrangling, But No Voting in New York State

The post More Wrangling, But No Voting in New York State appeared first on SportsHandle.

On Friday, S7900, a bill to legalize sports betting in New York, underwent amendment and new printing as lawmakers continue to wrangle in the hopes of passing sports betting legislation before the session ends on June

The post More Wrangling, But No Voting in New York State appeared first on SportsHandle.

On Friday, S7900, a bill to legalize sports betting in New York, underwent amendment and new printing as lawmakers continue to wrangle in the hopes of passing sports betting legislation before the session ends on June 20. The bill, sponsored by Senator John Bonacic (R-District 42) is on its third iteration.

The bill, now S7900C, now calls for an integrity fee to be paid to the professional leagues of “one fifth of one percent,” down from a quarter of one percent in previous versions of the bill. The legislation also calls for the professional sports leagues to bring proof to the state of what was spent on integrity monitoring in order to receive compensation. Previously, the fee was set to be paid with no strings attached.

The pro leagues, the NBA and Major League Baseball in particular, have been lobbying states across the nation to include a payout for increased integrity monitoring as sports betting becomes legal. But so far, no state has passed legislation with a fee, and if New York state does, it would be the first.

New York Lawmakers Are Pushing for Legal NY Sports Betting, But Can’t Reach a Consensus, and Prospects Appear Dim. 

Earlier this month, legendary ex-New York Yankees manager Joe Torre became the latest in a parade of former and current athletes to visit the state capital and lobby for the integrity fee.

The new language in Bonacic’s bill appears similar to the language in an Assembly bill introduced by Gary Pretlow (D-District 89) last week.

New York State Bills on Sports Betting, Originally Proposed in 2017, Head to Committee As New York Gears Up for Possible Repeal of Federal Ban on Sports Wagering
An OTB parlor in New York

Despite the changes, the chance for passage appears dim as there are multiple issues that still must be ironed out. Thursday, Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie (D-District 83) held little hope that sports betting would be made legal before the end of the session.

“Members raised significant issues, so I would say at this point there isn’t enough support within the Democratic conference to want to go forward on sports gambling,” Heastie told the Democrat and Chronicle

Lawmakers have reportedly been meeting all week to come to a consensus, but as yet have not.

New York Lawmakers May Be Feeling Pressure to Make NY Sports Betting Legal After Neighboring New Jersey Did So Last Week. 

A second bill, S1282, which was originally introduced in January 2017, was recommitted to the Judiciary Committee on Thursday after languishing in that same committee since January of this year. The bill would allow for sports betting in New York, but would send the final decision to the voters.

Empire State lawmakers appear to be feeling pressure to legalize sports betting sooner than later after neighbor New Jersey did June 11 and accepted its first sports bet at Monmouth Park on June 14. Pennsylvania, which borders New York to the west, legalized sports betting in 2017 but has yet to begin accepting sports wagers. Further south, Delaware became the first state since the Supreme Court struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act on May 14 to offer sports betting, when it did so on June 8.

MORE FROM SPORTSHANDLE
Sports betting news, business and stories Las Vegas live odds
Where can I bet online? Check out our betting legislation tracker MLB, NFL, NCAA and more game coverage and sports betting breakdowns
The latest on sports betting legislation and regulation The latest sports betting podcast ‘The Hedge’ from Jimmy Shapiro

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Get a Grip: The Week in Sports Betting and Sports

The post Get a Grip: The Week in Sports Betting and Sports appeared first on SportsHandle.

It’s information overload everywhere, and there’s not time enough to sleep and eat and stay fully apprised of what’s happening on this crazy blue dot of ours (two out of three ain’t bad).

Here’s this

The post Get a Grip: The Week in Sports Betting and Sports appeared first on SportsHandle.

It’s information overload everywhere, and there’s not time enough to sleep and eat and stay fully apprised of what’s happening on this crazy blue dot of ours (two out of three ain’t bad).

Here’s this week’s “Get a Grip,” rounding up top stories in sports betting and gaming, and the world of sports at large. You may have missed them, and they are worth reading. This is meant to be brief, so that’s it.


NJ Sports Betting Begins and the Most Interesting, Important Sports Betting, Gaming and Sports Stories of the Week:

Let’s start with the biggest news of the week then dive into the rest:

New Jersey sports betting is off and running! The scene at Monmouth Park in Oceanport was lively as Governor Phil Murphy (he of Murphy v NCAA fame) placed the first two legal wagers at the William Hill Race & Sports Book shortly after 10:30 a.m. on Thursday.

Further downstate, the Borgata Hotel & Resort became the first Atlantic City property to start punching tickets where NBA great Dr. J, aka Julius Erving (some great theater for the Association to enjoy) , bet on the Philadelphia Eagles to repeat as Super Bowl champions.


The rest of the highlights and stories to read over the weekend:

HOPE FLOATS: Why New York should pass sports betting law NOW [NY Post]

REALITY BITES:  New York sports betting bill on ‘life support’ in legislature [LSR]

TO BE CLEAR: New Jersey regulators clarify eSports betting ban [eSports Insider]

CHANGE: Alabama’s longtime hostility toward gambling shows signs of fading [NYT]

NEW WORLD: William Hill ‘inundated’ by U.S. sports teams seeking sponsorship: CEO [Reuters]

GRANDSTANDING: MLB tells Monmouth Park: Your ads are not welcome [ROI NJ]

DELUDED: PASPA author Bill Bradley is completely disconnected from sports betting reality [Nation]

UNIONS: Pro player unions want protection for athletes with legal wagering expansion [AP]

In the World of Sports At Large:

How Atlanta used its 1990s blueprint to build emergent Baby Braves [ESPN]
Oops, you weren’t supposed to see that cool MLB umpire video [TBL]

Tweets of the Week:

Videos of the Week:

In which Mike Francesa invents daily fantasy sports:

Vladimir Putin reacts to Russia’s fifth goal against Saudi Arabia:

View post on imgur.com

ICYMI at Sports Handle:

In Rhode Island, a bill explicitly forbids payment of “integrity fee” to leagues

The great Hammering Hank Goldberg talks Pete Rose’s wagering, his own first wager and much more on “The Hedge”

A timeline and brief history of the “integrity fee” debate

Have a great weekend, everyone!

MORE FROM SPORTSHANDLE
Sports betting news, business and stories Las Vegas live odds
Where can I bet online? Check out our betting legislation tracker MLB, NFL, NCAA and more game coverage and sports betting breakdowns
The latest on sports betting legislation and regulation The latest sports betting podcast ‘The Hedge’ from Jimmy Shapiro

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Rhode Island Ready to Legalize Sports Betting, But Says ‘No’ to Integrity Fee

The post Rhode Island Ready to Legalize Sports Betting, But Says ‘No’ to Integrity Fee appeared first on SportsHandle.

The state of Rhode Island could very likely be the next to offer legal sports betting. The state legislature is set to vote on an appropriations bill that outlines a framework for

The post Rhode Island Ready to Legalize Sports Betting, But Says ‘No’ to Integrity Fee appeared first on SportsHandle.

The state of Rhode Island could very likely be the next to offer legal sports betting. The state legislature is set to vote on an appropriations bill that outlines a framework for legal RI sports betting on Friday, and according to the text, voters in Rhode Island have already approved sports betting.

The bill, H7200A, an appropriations bill for fiscal year 2019, has a 15-page section relating to sports betting and Rhode Island’s governor has long had a sports betting budget item – on the income side – in her 2019 budget. H7200A is proof of where the money would come from.

Governor Gina Raimondo has earmarked $23.5 million in sports betting revenue in her budget.

Rhode Island Lawmakers Are Set to Vote Appropriations Bill That Would Make RI Sports Betting Legal, But Expressly Forbids ‘Integrity Fee.’

The appropriations bill calls for the state lottery to regulate sports betting at Rhode Island’s two gaming facilities at Twin River and Tiverton, both tribal-owned gaming facilities.

NBA, MLB Hire Rhode Island Lobbyist for $2.5K a Pop In Connection With Sports Betting Legislation and Debate

The bill not only does not include the integrity fee that the major professional sports leagues have been lobbying for, it actually expressly forbids paying that fee:

42-61.2-5. Allocation of sports wagering revenue.

(d) Under no circumstances shall the state or the division pay an integrity fee to any sports league. [Article 4, Relating to Taxes and Revenue, page 20, line 4 of the bill ]

Should the bill pass, Rhode Island would become the second state to pass legislation without an integrity fee (New Jersey was the first on June 11) since the Supreme Court struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act on May 14. Rhode Island would also become the third state, behind Delaware and New Jersey to accept sports bets in a state with no payout to the pro leagues.

Key Points in RI Sports Betting Bill, Set for Vote on Friday.

Among the other key items in the bill:

  • Rhode Island casinos will not accept bets on any Rhode Island collegiate team, regardless of where the event is taking place;
  • Patrons may place sports bets at state video-lottery terminals;
  • The bill does allow for mobile and/or internet gaming, but specifies “on-premises remote sports wagering;”
  • The bill would require the Twin River and Tiverton facilities to “pay the division all reasonable costs and expenses associated with the division’s oversight of and review of the operation of sports wagering,” which essentially means the casinos will be paying for their own integrity monitoring;
  • Data used in Rhode Island sports betting would not come from the leagues, but from a “sports wagering vendor;”
  • The bill requires the state to pay the towns of Lincoln (home to Twin River Casino) and Tiverton $100,000 annually as payment for those communities hosting sports betting.

While the tax rate is not directly addressed in the bill, there is a section that reads: “under no circumstances shall the Twin River and Tiverton gaming facilities or any sports wagering vendor receive a larger share of sports wagering revenue than the state.”

However Rhode Island lawmakers have structured the bill, they key element is timing. Should the state assembly pass the appropriations bill Friday, it seems a sure bet that Raimondo will sign it into law and Rhode Island.

How quickly can the state mobilize to begin accepting sports bets? If Delaware, another small state, is any example, the answer is sooner than later. Delaware on June 8 became the first state post-PASPA to accept sports wagers, and many in the state credited its “nimbleness” [read: small ] as a key reason it was able to act quickly. Rhode Island is the smallest state in the nation.

MORE FROM SPORTSHANDLE
Sports betting news, business and stories Las Vegas live odds
Where can I bet online? Check out our betting legislation tracker MLB, NFL, NCAA and more game coverage and sports betting breakdowns
The latest on sports betting legislation and regulation The latest sports betting podcast ‘The Hedge’ from Jimmy Shapiro

 

 

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