June 5, 2018; Stanton, DE, USA; At 1:30 p.m. today Tuesday, June 5, 2018, Delaware launches the country's first full-scale sports betting operation outside of Nevada as people roll into the Casino at Delaware Park in Stanton, Del. to wager their bets. Mandatory Credit: Suchat Pederson/The News Journal via USA TODAY NETWORK

Record 45.2M Americans expected to bet on NFL in 2021

A record 45.2 million Americans are expected to wager during this upcoming NFL season, a 36 percent increase year-over-year, the American Gaming Association (AGA) announced Tuesday.

The increase is largely due to eight more states where fans can legally bet compared to 2020. Americans can wager in 26 states versus 18 one year ago.

Further, three more states (Arizona, South Dakota, Washington) are expected to come online by Thursday’s regular season kickoff and two more by the end of the season.

“Importantly, when the 2021 NFL season begins, more than 111m American adults will be able to wager safely with regulated sportsbooks in their home states rather than with the predatory illegal market,” AGA president and CEO Bill Miller said in a statement.

Based on its research, AGA projects that five million Americans will place a bet online (up 73 percent YOY) while seven million will bet with a bookie (up just 13 percent).

The Kansas City Chiefs are the most popular Super Bowl bet among Americans, followed by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Dallas Cowboys.

–Field Level Media

Oct 2, 2020; Baltimore, Maryland, USA;  A view of the Betting Area sign at Pimlico Race Course. Mandatory Credit: Tommy Gilligan-USA TODAY Sports

AGA: Super Bowl betting expected to drop 37 percent

More than 23 million Americans plan to wager approximately $4.3 billion on Super Bowl LV, a decrease of 37 percent from last year.

That’s according to survey research published Tuesday by the American Gaming Association, which attributes the vast majority of the drop to pandemic-led issues leading to a decline in wagers at retail sportsbooks and social settings, such as office and square pools.

The research did find that a record 7.6 million will bet with online sportsbooks, up 63 percent from 2020. That is the result of 36 million American adults gaining access to regulated betting markets in their home states.

“This year’s Super Bowl is expected to generate the largest single-event legal handle in American sports betting history,” AGA President and CEO Bill Miller said. “With a robust legal market, Americans are abandoning illegal bookies and taking their action into the regulated marketplace in record numbers.”

Colorado, Illinois, Michigan, Montana, Tennessee, Virginia and Washington, D.C. have added regulated betting markets since last year’s Super Bowl. That brings the United States total to 20 states and the District of Columbia.

The online survey of 2,198 adults was conducted on behalf of the AGA by Morning Consult. It found that 1.4 million Americans plan to bet at an in-person sportsbook, down 61 percent from last year. Meanwhile, 1.8 million Americans plan to place a bet with a bookie, down 21 percent.

A similar study last year estimated that 26 million Americans planned to wager a combined $6.8 billion on Super Bowl LIV.

Despite the significant drop overall betting, this year’s study did find that 65 percent of Americans who plan to wager on the game feel it is important to do so with a regulated sportsbook.

“This data is an encouraging sign that our efforts to ground the expansion of sports betting in responsible gaming is taking hold,” Miller said. “Responsible gaming is core to legal sports betting’s long-term success, and this is borne out by continued demand for consumer protections only available in the legal market.”

–Field Level Media

Study: MLB, NBA to Yield Combined $1.7 Billion From Legal Sports Betting

The American Gaming Association on Thursday released the results of two more Nielsen studies, showing how America’s professional sports leagues stand to benefit from legal, regulated sports betting. The latest studies indicate that Major League Baseball will see a revenue increase of $1.106 billion, and the NBA is look at a $585 million bump. Combined with research from previous studies on the NFL and NHL, U.S. professional sports leagues can expect an overall combined revenue boost of $4.23 billion.

The increased revenue won’t come from the “integrity fee” or “royalty” that some of the professional sports leagues have been lobbying for, but rather from increased fan engagement (media rights, sponsorships, merchandise, tickets) and through gaming (TV advertising, sponsorships, data packages).

According to the studies, MLB will net $952 million from increased fan engagement and $154 million from gaming-related revenue. The NBA should see increases of $425 million and $160 million, respectively. Results of previous studies showed that the NFL will see the biggest benefit, an overall increase in revenue of $2.33 billion, and the NHL can expect an increase of $216 million.

 

Read more Study: MLB, NBA to Yield Combined $1.7 Billion From Legal Sports Betting on SportsHandle.

Here’s What Happened at the House Judiciary Hearing on Sports Betting

 

A House Judiciary subcommittee hearing titled “Post-PASPA: An Examination of Sports Betting in America” proceeded on Thursday under the shadow of a more high-profile hearing in the Senate.

Little new ground was covered during the one-and-a-half hour session that largely afforded the five witnesses an opportunity to reiterate their main positions underscored in the written statements submitted prior to the session.

Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security and Investigations, Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI), began by noting “This is just the beginning of the conversation,” and concluded by opining that “for Congress to do nothing” on the matter would be the worst possible outcome. What follows is a synopsis of highlights and lowlights.

 

 

Read more Here’s What Happened at the House Judiciary Hearing on Sports Betting on SportsHandle.

AGA to Schumer: Sports Betting Doesn’t Need Federal Oversight

The post AGA to Schumer: Sports Betting Doesn’t Need Federal Oversight appeared first on SportsHandle.

“Additional federal engagement is not warranted at this time.”

Those words close the first paragraph of the American Gaming Association‘s latest volley in the discussion about the creation of federal sports betting regulation. The AGA, a national trade group, has been on the front lines in working with stakeholders to streamline the legislative process as sports betting becomes legal in more and more states.

On Thursday, it released a letter sent to Democratic Senator Chuck Schumer (New York), in response to Schumer’s call for a federal framework that would, among other things, require sportsbooks to use “official” league data and would allow the professional sports leagues a voice in determining what kinds of bets could be placed. The letter is intended as a reply to Schumer’s staff, which requested additional information from the AGA following an Aug. 2 meeting.

Read more of AGA to Schumer: Sports Betting Doesn’t Need Federal Oversight  on SportsHandle.