Wisconsin athletic director Barry Alvarez is shown on the sidelines during the first quarter against Utah State at Camp Randall Stadium on September 1, 2017, Madison, Wisconsin.

Ncaa Football Utah State At Wisconsin

Wisconsin to dedicate field to longtime coach/AD Barry Alvarez

The University of Wisconsin is honoring former coach and athletic director Barry Alvarez by naming their home field in his honor, school officials announced on Friday night.

Alvarez, 74, retired over the summer after 32 years at the university.

The field will be called Barry Alvarez Field at Camp Randall Stadium starting in 2022.

“Barry Alvarez has had an immeasurable impact on the UW-Madison campus, beyond the state and in college sports,” said chancellor Rebecca Blank at Friday’s ceremony. “And that type of career deserves recognition at the very highest level.

Alvarez said he was moved by the tribute.

“I’m touched. I’m honored,” said Alvarez. “That means so much to me to have my name on this field. Thank you for this. For my name on the field, that is very touching and very meaningful to me.”

The school is also set to honor Alvarez during Saturday’s game against No. 14 Michigan.

Alvarez spent the past 18 seasons leading the Badgers’ athletic department after 16 seasons as the football coach; he held both positions for two seasons. During his tenure, Wisconsin sports won 16 national team titles and 74 Big Ten regular-season or tournament championships. He was named Under Armour Athletic Director of the Year in 2017-18.

Alvarez arrived in Madison in 1990 and turned a downtrodden football team into a perennial Big Ten contender, leading them to three Rose Bowl titles until he stepped aside in 2005 to concentrate on his duties as athletic director.

The football team was 119-74-4 in his 16 seasons, including 9-4 in bowl games. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2010.

–Field Level Media

Deputy Athletic Director Chris McIntosh, who captained Wisconsin's back-to-back Big Ten and Rose Bowl champions in 1998 and 1999, speaks to several thousand Badgers fans gathered for a pep rally outside LA Live on Dec. 30, 2019, in Los Angeles. The 8th-ranked Badgers faced 6th-ranked Oregon Ducks in the Rose Bowl Jan. 1, 2020.

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Wisconsin promotes alum Chris McIntosh to athletic director

Wisconsin will introduce Chris McIntosh, a former Badgers football player, as athletic director on Wednesday. He succeeds Barry Alvarez, who is retiring June 30 after 18 seasons.

McIntosh, 44, has worked in the Wisconsin athletic department since 2014 and as deputy athletic director since 2017, overseeing the day-to-day operations of the department, student-athlete recruitment, business development, human resources and strategic planning.

“Chris is a natural leader who loves the Badgers and cares about our student-athletes,” chancellor Rebecca Blank said. “He is uniquely positioned to continue our proud traditions of success on and off the field and doing things ‘the right way.’ Chris will build upon those traditions and has a strong vision for leading the program during a time of change in college athletics.”

A Wisconsin native, McIntosh played football at Pewaukee High School before enrolling at Wisconsin in 1996. He played four seasons on the offensive line and was a team captain and a consensus first-team All-American as a senior in 1999. He was a member of the Badgers teams that won the Rose Bowl in 1999 and 2000 and was inducted in the school’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 2014.

The Seattle Seahawks selected him No. 22 overall in the 2000 draft, but injuries limited him to just 24 NFL games. He retired after the 2002 season.

“I owe so much to the University of Wisconsin, and I’m deeply honored to be able to succeed Barry Alvarez,” McIntosh said. “We will build upon our legacy of success on the field of competition and support our student-athletes in the classroom, on campus and after college.”

His promotion was praised, even by opponents.

“Chris is an excellent hire and is uniquely prepared to lead the University of Wisconsin Athletic department,” said Gene Smith, who has served as athletic director at Ohio State since 2005.

“He has the highest of integrity, knows the culture of Badger athletics, is respected by his peers in the Big Ten Conference and will bring the former student-athlete experience to his leadership style, which I feel is invaluable.”

–Field Level Media

Sep 16, 2017; Provo, UT, USA; Wisconsin Badgers athletic director Barry Alvarez reacts during a NCAA football game against the Brigham Young Cougars at LaVell Edwards Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

Wisconsin AD Barry Alvarez to retire

Sep 1, 2018; Charlotte, NC, USA; A Tennessee Volunteers helmet is seen pregame before the game against the West Virginia Mountaineers at Bank of America Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Ben Queen-USA TODAY Sports

Wisconsin athletic director Barry Alvarez announced his retirement on Tuesday after 32 years at the university, effective June 30.

He spent the past 18 seasons leading the Badgers’ athletic department after 16 seasons as the football coach; he held both positions for two seasons. During his tenure, Wisconsin sports have won 16 national team titles and 74 Big Ten regular-season or tournament championships. He was named Under Armour Athletic Director of the Year in 2017-18.

“It has been an honor to be a part of Wisconsin Athletics and I take great pride in all we have accomplished over the last three decades,” Alvarez, 74, said. “From championships, to improvements on campus, to impacting thousands of student-athletes, it’s been a great ride. I’m grateful for the support, generosity, enthusiasm and loyalty of Badgers in the state of Wisconsin and beyond.”

Alvarez arrived in Madison in 1990 and turned a downtrodden football team into a perennial Big Ten contender, leading them to three Rose Bowl titles until he stepped aside in 2005 to concentrate on his duties as athletic director.

The football team was 119-74-4 in his 16 seasons, including 9-4 in bowl games. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2010.

“We thank Barry for his hard work, devotion to UW-Madison, and the standard of excellence he has set for our athletic program,” chancellor Rebecca Blank said. “His work here has positively impacted the lives of countless student-athletes who have come through our doors.

“His leadership has also lifted our university and our state. Barry’s legacy will live on whenever Badgers take the field.”

Alvarez is credited with overseeing a fundraising drive that brought in more than $150 million over the past 10 years as well as numerous capital projects. Under his leadership, the university instilled the Forward 360 initiative, which provides support for athletes in academics, career and leadership, inclusion and engagement, nutrition, and strength and conditioning.

Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson, who played one season at Wisconsin, was among the first to extend well wishes to his former coach.

“‘Son … there’s this school up north, University of Wisconsin. They’ve got this Hall of Fame Coach, Barry Alvarez. You should play for him one day’ -My dad HBW III when I was 10,” Wilson tweeted. “Thanks for everything Coach. Grateful we got to spend such quality time together that year!”

Alvarez was set to meet the media Tuesday afternoon.

–Field Level Media

Jan 1, 2020; Pasadena, California, USA; Wisconsin Badgers head coach Paul Chryst looks on in the first half against the Oregon Ducks in the 106th Rose Bowl game at Rose Bowl Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Robert Hanashiro-USA TODAY Sports

No. 13 Wisconsin believes game at Michigan will be played

The 13th-ranked Wisconsin Badgers resumed practice Monday morning, and athletic director Barry Alvarez believes the season will resume as well on Saturday night at Michigan.

Wisconsin (1-0) has not played since opening the shortened Big Ten Conference season with a 45-7 win over Illinois on Oct. 23. Since then, the Badgers have been forced to cancel games at Nebraska and at home against Purdue over the last two weekends as a COVID-19 outbreak has surged through the program.

As recently as last week, Wisconsin reported 27 active COVID-19 cases, involving 15 players and 12 staff members. Included in that pool were head coach Paul Chryst and two of the team’s three quarterbacks — Graham Mertz and Chase Wolf.

Alvarez expressed confidence on Monday, however, that the Badgers can get back on track with their season.

“We feel confident that we have a handle on the situation and are excited to play this week at Michigan,” Alvarez said. “As we have done throughout, we will continue to monitor our testing results and base our decision on those results.”

Wisconsin reported Monday the program currently has five active COVID-19 cases, spread across two players and three staff members. In testing since Nov. 2, Wisconsin said only one staff member and one player have tested positive and claimed no positive tests in five of the last six days.

“We had no new positives on Tuesday and Wednesday, which was a great sign,” Alvarez said. “So we were cautious on Friday and Saturday, split guys into groups, and just did conditioning. The team then got together and held its regular Monday practice this morning.”

Under Big Ten rules, a team must play a minimum of six games to be eligible to play in the conference championship game. Wisconsin must play all of its remaining games to qualify.

After Michigan (1-2), Wisconsin has scheduled games remaining at No. 23 Northwestern, at home against Minnesota and No. 10 Indiana, and on the road at Iowa.

The conference title game is slated for Dec. 19.

–Field Level Media