Posts Tagged ‘draft’

Dion Caputi’s 2018 NFL Draft position rankings (2.0)

Dion Caputi’s 2018 NFL Draft position rankings are based on pre/post-Combine film study and encompass evaluations from various All-Star bowls (Shrine Game, Senior Bowl, etc.). Note: Honorable mentions (“HM”) aren’t necessarily the No. 6 rated players by position, but noteworthy nevertheless.

*Bracketed numbers denote previous ranking.

Position rankings (1.0), released on

Dion Caputi’s 2018 NFL Draft position rankings are based on pre/post-Combine film study and encompass evaluations from various All-Star bowls (Shrine Game, Senior Bowl, etc.). Note: Honorable mentions (“HM”) aren’t necessarily the No. 6 rated players by position, but noteworthy nevertheless.

*Bracketed numbers denote previous ranking.

Position rankings (1.0), released on February 13, 2018.


Quarterback

  1. Josh Rosen, UCLA (2)
  2. Sam Darnold, USC (1)
  3. Baker Mayfield, OU (3)
  4. Lamar Jackson, LOU (4)
  5. Mike White, WKU (n/a)

HM: Riley Ferguson, MEM (5)


Running Back

  1. Saquon Barkley, PSU (1)
  2. Derrius Guice, LSU (4)
  3. Ronald Jones, USC (2)
  4. Sony Michel, UGA (3)
  5. Kerryon Johnson, AUB (5)

HM: Nick Chubb, UGA (n/a)


Wide Receiver

Antonio Callaway, fresh off a tremendous Combine, could be one of the steals of the draft at receiver.

Antonio Callaway, fresh off a tremendous Combine, could be one of the steals of the draft at receiver.

  1. Anthony Miller, MEM (1)
  2. Calvin Ridley, BAMA (2)
  3. Christian Kirk, TAMU (3)
  4. Equanimeous St. Brown, ND (5)
  5. D.J. Chark, LSU (n/a)

HM: Antonio Callaway, UF (n/a)


Tight Ends

  1. Mike Gesicki, PSU (2)
  2. Dallas Goedert, SDST (n/a)
  3. Hayden Hurst, SCAR (3)
  4. Tyler Conklin, CMU (5)
  5. Mark Andrews, OU (1)

HM: Adam Breneman, UMASS (HM)


Offensive Tackle

  1. Mike McGlinchey, ND (1)
  2. Desmond Harrison, WGA (2)
  3. Connor Williams, UT (4)
  4. Orlando Brown, OU (3)
  5. Kolton Miller, UCLA (n/a)

HM: Brian O’Neill, PITT (n/a)


Offensive Guard/Center

  1. Quenton Nelson, ND (1)
  2. Isaiah Wynn, UGA (2)
  3. Will Hernandez, UTEP (n/a)
  4. Billy Price, OSU (3)
  5. James Daniels, IOWA (n/a)

HM: Rod Taylor, MISS (n/a)


Interior Defensive Line/Defensive Tackle

  1. Vita Vea, UW (1)
  2. Da’Ron Payne, BAMA (n/a)
  3. Taven Bryan, UF (3)
  4. Rasheem Green, USC (2)
  5. Harrison Phillips, STAN (n/a)

HM: Nathan Shepherd, FHST (n/a)

Kansas star Dorance Armstrong Jr. is perfectly suited to a 3-4 edge role at the next level.

Kansas star Dorance Armstrong Jr. is perfectly suited to a 3-4 edge role at the next level.


Edge Defender/Defensive End

  1. Bradley Chubb, NCST (1)
  2. Harold Landry, BC (4)
  3. Marcus Davenport, UTST (2)
  4. Sam Hubbard, OSU (n/a)
  5. Andrew Brown, UVA (n/a)

HM: Dorance Armstrong Jr., UK (n/a)


Linebacker

  1. Roquan Smith, UGA (1)
  2. Tremaine Edmunds, VT (2)
  3. Leighton Vander Esch, BSU (3)
  4. Lorenzo Carter, UGA (HM)
  5. Shaquem Griffin, UCF (5)

HM: Kemoko Turay, RUT (n/a)


Cornerback

  1. Jaire Alexander, LOU (2)
  2. Denzel Ward, OSU (3)
  3. Joshua Jackson, IOWA (1)
  4. Mike Hughes, UCF (5)
  5. Isaiah Oliver, CU (n/a)

HM: J.C. Jackson, UMD (n/a)


Safety

  1. Minkah Fitzpatrick, BAMA (1)
  2. Derwin James, FSU (2)
  3. Ronnie Harrison, BAMA (4)
  4. Justin Reid, STAN (5)
  5. DeShon Elliott, UT (3)

HM: Dane Cruikshank, UA (n/a)

Kicker/Punter

  1. Michael Dickson, UT (1, punter)
  2. Eddy Pineiro, UF (2, kicker)
  3. Matthew McCrane, KSU (3, kicker)
  4. Daniel Carlson, AUB (4, kicker)
  5. Shane Tripucka, TAMU (5, punter)

HM: Ryan Santoso, UMN (HM, punter/kickoff specialist)

Hit me on Twitter: @NFLDraftUpdate

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14 players that need to have a strong Pro Day

Ameer Abdullah

Now that the Combine is complete, the next phase in the evaluation process are the pro days. Starting next week, there will be numerous pro days Monday through Friday, through the month of March. When a club really wants to get up close and personal with a prospect, they will schedule a private workout with

Now that the Combine is complete, the next phase in the evaluation process are the pro days. Starting next week, there will be numerous pro days Monday through Friday, through the month of March. When a club really wants to get up close and personal with a prospect, they will schedule a private workout with the player but we wont see many of these until after their school has it’s pro day.

The pro day is important for a number of reasons. First off, the players from a school who weren’t invited to the Combine get to workout in front of NFL evaluators. Every year there are about 35 players who did not get invited to the Combine who end up getting drafted.

Over the years, I have seen some drafted as high as the second round, but the majority of these players start coming off the board starting around the fourth round. While teams are interested in these players because of the way they played during the season, their performance on their pro day is also important in the evaluation process. These non-combine players have to have workout numbers better or similar to invited players at their position.

The pro days are also important for the players that didn’t live up to expectations at the Combine. The players who are happy with their Combine results will not take part in the measurable events such as the 40, the 20 yard shuttle, the 3-cone and the jumps. They will only do the position-specific drills for coaches after the measurable drills are finished.

There are other players who feel they need to improve on some of their combine times in order to keep their value high. After going through the Combine results, here are some players who may want to redo some of their drills.

Ameer Abdullah – Nebraska –  While his jumps and agilities were excellent, he only ran 4.61. He may want to run the 40 again.

Melvin Gordon –  Wisconsin – The same holds true for Gordon. I think every scout in the league felt Gordon would break 4.45. When he ran 4.52 that was a bit disappointing.

Duke Johnson – Miami – He is another running back who ran slower than expected. He may also want to try and improve on his 33.5″ vertical jump. Johnson did not run any of the agilities, so he needs to run those also.

Trae Waynes – Michigan State – While Waynes ran fast, his agility times were slow compared with the other top corner prospects. Slow times in the agility drills can mean a prospect is tight in the knees or hips.

Marcus Peters –  Washington – Marcus looks fast on tape, but he didn’t run fast at Indy. 4.54 is not first round corner speed. His other drills were good enough.

Kevin Johnson – Wake Forest – With Kevin, it’s the same story as Peters, excellent jumps and agilities and an average 40 time.

Ladarius Gunter – Miami – Most felt he would run in the low 4.5’s. He ran in the 4.60’s. He has to run again.

Quinten Rollins – Miami (Ohio) – He ran much slower than anticipated, the problem he may have is Miami (Ohio) does not have an indoor facility and he may want to wait until early April before he attempts to run again.

Danny Shelton – Washington – Every one want to compare Shelton to Ngata, but Ngata ran a 5.13 at Indy and Shelton ran in the 5.6’s. He needs to improve his speed or his value will drop a little.

Justin Hardy – East Carolina – I never thought Hardy was a burner, but his average time of 4.58 is not quite fast enough.

Vince Mayle – Washington State – The same holds true with Mayle as he ran 4.67.

Maxx Williams – Minnesota –  His speed was disappointing in that he ran 4.85, 4.77. He needs to run in the 4.6’s if he wants to be considered as a first round candidate.

Paul Dawson – TCU – No one thought he was going to be a speedster, but 4.95 is way too slow. I would think he will be first in line to run at TCU’s pro day.

Shaq Thompson – Washington – Shaq plays like he can run in the mid 4.5’s. His 40 times were 4.72 and 4.69. If I were him, I’d run again.

Follow Greg on Twitter @greggabe

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The NFL Combine All-Stars

combine

Data from the recently completed NFL Combine is still being gathered. Based on the data that is already available, though, it is possible to take a quick crack at identifying those players who performed well and who belong on our annual Combine all-star team. Inclusion on the all-star team is based strictly on the measurable

Data from the recently completed NFL Combine is still being gathered. Based on the data that is already available, though, it is possible to take a quick crack at identifying those players who performed well and who belong on our annual Combine all-star team. Inclusion on the all-star team is based strictly on the measurable Combine drills and nothing else.

Data used in the analysis comes from NFL.com and from information accumulated by Mike Loyko.

The evaluation included only a player’s performance in the three most important drills for each playing position (as presented in the recent “Which Combine Drills Are Most Important” article). In some cases, data for a drill (e.g., the 20 yard segment of the 40 yard run) is not available. In such cases, the drills evaluated included the data from the top three drills for which data is available (e.g., for a playing position with no data for a “top three drill” immediately available, the fourth most important drill would be included instead).

The additional qualification is that a player must have participated in at least two of the three drills. Hence the exclusion of CB Byron Jones who did not do any of the running drills but blew the roof off the drills in which he did participate.

The All-Star team follows below. Whether performance in Indianapolis translates to performance on Sundays remains to be answered.

Center
Andrew Gallik – Boston College

Guards
Mark Glowinski – West Virginia
Laken Tomlinson, Duke

Tackles
Jake Fisher, Oregon
Ali Marpet, Hobart

Wide Receivers
Chris Conley, Georgia
Kenny Bell, Nebraska
Sammie Coates, Auburn

Tight End
Mycole Pruitt, Southern Illinois

Quarterback
Nick Marshall, Auburn

Small RB (<215 lbs)
Ameer Abdullah, Nebraska

Large RB
David Johnson, Northern Iowa

Small DE (<270 lbs)
Vic Beasley, Clemson

Large DE
Mario Edwards, Florida State

Defensive Tackle
David Parry, Stanford

Inside Linebackers
Eric Kendricks, UCLA
Stephone Anthony, Clemson

Outside Linebackers
Bud Dupree, Kentucky
Edmond Robinson, Newberry

Cornerbacks
Ronald Darby, Florida State
Jalen Collins, Louisiana State

Safeties
Justin Cox, Mississippi State
Damarious Randall, Arizona State

Follow Tony on Twitter @draftmetrics

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2015 NFL Combine Notebook – Part IV

nfl combine

Going into this year's Combine, the safety class looked weak compared with the last few years. There have been a few scouts who have told me that they feel there is only one legitimate starter in this year's class and that's Alabama's Landon Collins. There are other players who have a chance to be eventual

Going into this year’s Combine, the safety class looked weak compared with the last few years. There have been a few scouts who have told me that they feel there is only one legitimate starter in this year’s class and that’s Alabama’s Landon Collins. There are other players who have a chance to be eventual starters, but it’s not a certainty.

As for the corner class, it has some depth to it, but when you look at the numbers posted yesterday, the athletic talent is average as compared to past years.

Trae Waynes – Michigan State

Waynes didn’t disappoint as he ran a 4.32 in the 40. I was a little disappointed in his agility drills, where he posted times of 7.06 in the 3-cone and 4.39 in the 20 yard shuttle. There are linebackers who had better times. Don’t be surprised if he runs those drills again at the MSU pro day.

Byron Jones – UConn

Jones was the talk of the day after jumping 44.5″ in the vertical and 12’2″ in the long jump to set a combine record. His 20-yard shuttle and 3-cone were also impressive. His 20-yard shuttle time was 3.94 and his 3-come was 6.78. The amazing part about those times is that Jones was just cleared to start working out after having shoulder surgery. He hasn’t spent the last four to six weeks at a training facility preparing for the combine. Those numbers were on pure natural ability. Going into the Combine, Jones wasn’t on many teams’ radars. After that performance, you can bet all 32 clubs will be visiting UConn over the next six weeks.

Kevin Johnson – Wake Forest

Kevin didn’t run as expected, timing 4.52 in the 40, but the rest of his workout was outstanding. He had a 41″ vertical and went 10’10” in the long jump, while his agilities were 3.89 and 6.79 respectively. With Johnson’s height and length and overall athleticism, he is a sure first round pick but I would bet he runs again at his pro day to try and improve on that 4.52.

Steve Nelson – Oregon State

After doing tape work on Nelson, I was excited because I love the way he plays the game. On tape he is quick, feisty and aggressive. What I thought might hurt him was his height. I thought he may be under 5’10, which is the cutoff number for many teams at the corner position. He measured an even 5’10 at Indy with 30 5/8″ arms. With him running 4.49, he will be on every team’s draft board and will most likely be drafted in the second or third round. He is a fun player to watch.

Adrian Amos – Penn State

With the safety position lacking quality depth, Amos really helped himself. At 6000 – 218 he has very good size. I think many people were surprised at how well he tested. He ran the 40 in 4.49, had a 35.5″ vertical jump, 10’2″ long jump and agilities of 4.03 and 7.09. Those were all very good numbers for the safety position.

Anthony Harris from  Virginia and Derron Smith from Fresno State did not workout, so we will have to wait until their pro days to find out what they can do.

Kurtis Drummond – Michigan State

There were mixed opinions on Drummond going into the Combine and if anything, he may have hurt himself with his speed. He ran 4.65 and 4.70 with his two 40’s. He did much better with the other drills, going 39.5 in the vertical and 7.09 in the 3 cone. He didn’t bench, so at the MSU pro day he will need to run again as well as lift.

Cody Prewitt – Ole Miss

Prewitt is another player who will need to run again at his pro day. He ran 4.60 and 4.70 on his two 40’s. With that difference, scouts are wondering which one is right?

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Monday Morning MD

Todd Gurley

2015 NFL season has begun

With the start of the Scouting Combine, teams have turned the page on the 2014 season. The 2015 NFL season kicks off with the annual Indiana migration like MLB starts with spring training in Arizona/Florida.  Like baseball, hope springs eternal as all 32 teams feel they have a chance to

2015 NFL season has begun

With the start of the Scouting Combine, teams have turned the page on the 2014 season. The 2015 NFL season kicks off with the annual Indiana migration like MLB starts with spring training in Arizona/Florida.  Like baseball, hope springs eternal as all 32 teams feel they have a chance to hoist the Lombardi Trophy. Athletic trainers and other personnel have already begun their combine week as of yesterday.

As a NFL team physician, I made 19 of these annual pilgrimages to Indianapolis. The dinners at St. Elmo’s (it used to be the only good restaurant in downtown but Indy has developed significantly over the years) symbolized the start of the new league year. For the medical staffs, the Super Bowl is a distant memory and last season’s clean up surgeries are usually completed by now.

It seems that Combine comes earlier and earlier each year and it does. This year marks the earliest start ever as the entire schedule has once again been moved up by a day. I remember when I began participating, it was three days of medical exams across a long weekend. Now it is four days of medical exams with team doctors arriving Tuesday. The entire Combine is over a week in length and is now a NFL Network made for TV mini-series.

The medical exam is what sets the Scouting Combine apart. Pro Days have watered down the combine workouts as more and more choose to skip the Indy on field evaluation for the school Pro Days.

After Combine comes the tedious process of reviewing all MRI imaging studies and completing final medical grades. Often this involves meeting with team management to explain and justify the medical downgrades. Next comes college player visits to teams and often a second chance for a medical evaluation. March brings free agency physical. The medical exams don’t always go smoothly, like what happened to Oakland last year.

Combine is not even limited to a week anymore. It is now “combine season”. Last year brought regional and super combines. This year there is even an inaugural Veteran’s Combine. Comprehensive physicals are not performed at the regional, super or veteran combines. The central role of the medical evaluation is what sets the main Scouting Combine apart.

 

MMMD 1: Todd Gurley knee exam is key

The medical evaluation of Todd Gurley’s reconstructed ACL is much anticipated. Combine is likely the only chance for NFL team physicians to examine his knee.

Undoubtedly, the ex-Georgia running back will not work out at Combine but his medical exam will play a large role in where he is drafted. Gurley doesn’t need to be ready today, he just needs to project to be good to go in the future. Expect him to return to medical re-checks in Indianapolis in six weeks so NFL medical staffs can monitor his progress before the draft.

In 2006, cornerback Antonio Cromartie was not medically cleared at Combine but he projected well enough coming off of ACL surgery for the Chargers to select him with the 19th pick overall despite missing the entire previous season.  This hopes to be a similar situation for Gurley and the team drafting him.

 

MMMD 2: Peyton Manning injuries won’t end his career

The quad tear that left Manning ineffective in his Divisional Playoff loss has essentially healed without surgery. The chronic neck issues have stabilized. Although his arm strength will never return to full form, injury will not end his career this offseason.

As expected, Manning has informed the Broncos he is healthy.  If he doesn’t return to Denver, it will be for reasons other than his quad or neck.

 

MMMD 3: Bradford back with Rams?

When Sam Bradford suffered a torn ACL for a second consecutive season, some felt his time in St Louis might be over. That may not be the case at all as the quarterback was consulted before the new Rams offensive coordinator was hired.

With medical advances, it is now possible to recover from double ACL surgery.  The fact that Bradford is a pocket quarterback only helps his cause.

 

MMMD 4:  ACL better second year back

In this society of immediate results, we often forget that the second season back is usually when a player coming off of ACL surgery fully recovers. The first year they can return to play but it is the next year where they typically excel.

Von Miller admitted to me that although he felt good in his first year back from ACL surgery, he was not 100% and next season will be even better.

“Revis Island” was a forgotten term but Darrelle Revis’ second season back from ACL surgery re-established him as a top shut down corner. His teammate, Rob Gronkowski struggled early season with his new ACL but hit his stride late season. Look for a bigger 2015 season from Gronk.

Defensive tackle Henry Melton was coming off ACL surgery in his first season with Dallas. His option was not picked up and he will be a free agent again. With this being his second year back from his ACL, some team may pick up a bargain as he should have a better year than 2014.

 

MMMD 5: NFLPA candidates want 18 games.

 

In this health and safety era, the NFLPA has taken a stance against two additional regular season games. When Eric Winston was elected president last year, he said a 18 game season was dead in the water.

The majority of candidates who want to be NFLPA executive director back the idea of expanded regular season.  It will be interesting to see how this all plays out in the coming month as the elections may be contentious with the feeling that the NFLPA got the worst end of the new CBA.

 

MMMD 6: Buffalo Bills athletic trainers named staff of the year

Congrats to Bud Carpenter and his crew for being named best in the NFL for a second time.  Last year, sources coming out of the Combine had Buffalo coaches wanting to replace the athletic training staff.

Last season, Chicago’s offensive coordinator gave a tearful apology for criticizing QB Jay Cutler and taking things outside the Bears family by leaking to media. I am not aware of Bills coaches apologizing to Carpenter or the team for apparently doing the same thing.

I suppose the ultimate apology is the athletic training staff just won a top award and are still employed, while the former Bills coaching staff is no longer in Buffalo.

 

MMMD 7: A year later, things remain the same

Pro Football Talk points out their February 11, 2014 and February 11, 2015 headlines are eerily similar.  Both stories chronicle the Browns owner saying his team is “not a mess with a straight face”.

Often team dysfunction is manifested in other ways and can even be seen on the medical side. The 2013 handling of Robert Griffin knee issues could be attributed to flawed Washington front office dynamics. Last year, the Browns attended Combine without a qualified head team physician. 

Cleveland has since hired a quality lead physician and has always had quality athletic trainers. Lets hope the rest of the Browns franchise follows suit.

Follow David on Twitter: @profootballdoc

Dr. David Chao is a former NFL head team physician with 17 years of sideline, locker and training room experience. He currently has a successful orthopedic/sports medicine practice in San Diego.

Dr. David Chao

Two decades of NFL team physician experience including two Super Bowls and two Pro Bowls. Providing unique perspective to injuries and the NFL sideline/locker room. Successful orthopedic surgery and sports medicine practice in Southern California.

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