PlaySugarHouse.com Launches N.J. Online Sports Betting Platform

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PlaySugarHouse.com has now launched an online sports betting platform for New Jersey sports bettors  significant in that it integrates the new sports wagering opportunity for state residents with its already operating online casino. This also makes the mobile/online sports betting platform the third available in New Jersey, on the heels of MGM’s Wednesday release of the Android version of its playMGM NJ Sports app through the MGM-owned Borgata in Atlantic City.

New Jersey gambling regulators had approved the site to go live Thursday morning and the company said it was taking sports wagers as of 6 a.m. 

The SugarHouse Online Sportsbook & Casino is the first online sports betting site operated under the aegis of the Golden Nugget Atlantic City, which has an online and fully licensed affiliation with Philadelphia’s SugarHouse Casino. The site is operated by Rush Street Interactive (RSI), the SugarHouse parent company.  RSI is also partnered with the Malta-headquartered sports betting supplier Kambi, which previously helped launch the DraftKings Sportsbook, which on Aug. 6 was the first online sportsbook to go live in New Jersey.

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MGM Drops Mobile Sportsbook In New Jersey With Borgata’s PlayMGM App

On Wednesday after two-plus weeks of waiting, the MGM-owned Borgata’s playMGM app will give company to the DraftKings Sportsbook, which had fully launched on August 6 and remained the only online sports betting app available in New Jersey.

But wait no more: the playMGM app is available now to New Jersey-based Android users. “The playMGM NJ Sports app is being initially soft-launched on the Android platform, with an iOS version due to launch imminently,” said MGM Resorts International in a statement coinciding with the app’s release. “Through our partnership with GVC Holdings, our mobile betting operations in New Jersey will be delivered on a best-in-class mobile platform that positions us as a leader in technology, accessibility and sports betting expertise” added Scott Butera, MGM Resorts International President of Interactive Gaming.

After zipping around the platform a bit from here in New Jersey, what follows is some initial impressions, notes on what you can bet and some odds and ends.

MGM’s New Jersey Online Sportsbook Available Through Borgata’s and playMGM App Ahead of Football Season

mgm online betting app nj legal sportsbooks


So what can patrons wager on? A lot.

There’s straight bets, futures, props, and parlays all available. The professional (NFL) and college football menus are queued up with a wide variety of different player and team props, futures and totals, such as:

  • Most regular season losses by any NFL team: o/u 13 (-110)
  • Deshaun Watson regular season touchdown passes o/u 26.5 (-110)
  • Kareem Hunt regular season rushing yards o/u 1099.5 (-110)
  • Regular season points by Philadelphia Eagles o/u 404.5 (-110)
  • Will the Texans make the playoffs?  Yes -130, No +110
  • Which two teams will make the Super Bowl? For example, Steelers/Saints is 50-1
  • Will Grier (West Virginia) regular season passing touchdowns: o/u 35.5 (-110)
  • Regular season wins by Nebraska 6.5 (o/EV, u -120)

What can’t folks wager on for now?  So far I did not find live or in-play wagering options on playMGM. It’s possible I’m missing them or they simply may not have been introduced yet. 

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DraftKings Sportsbook Fully Launches

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The DraftKings Sportsbook soft launch period is over and is now open to all players in New Jersey, the company announced on Monday. On Wednesday, August 1, the DFS-turned-sportsbook operator’s mobile sports betting app/web platform went live on an invite-only basis, the first such app available amongst the New Jersey sports betting licensees.

“I am excited to begin this new chapter in our story by officially launching what I believe to be the most innovative, mobile sports betting product in the U.S.,” said Jason Robins, CEO and co-founder of DraftKings. “We have put immense thought and significant resources behind the development of DraftKings Sportsbook and I’m confident that sports fans in New Jersey will enjoy using it to make the experience of watching the games even more interesting and thrilling.”

The initial launch period was met with some positive reviews — mostly of the technology — and some negativity, mostly of its pricing. Going forward, there’s room for upgrades on both fronts.

DraftKings Sportsbook Goes Live to Masses After Becoming First NJ Online Sportsbook to Launch Last Week; A Look What You’ll See & Some Notes

On its hours-old Twitter handle @DKSportsbook, the company was quick to notify people that you don’t have to be among the 9 million New Jersey residents to use the book (or roughly 6.75 million ages 21 and up):

 

The soft launch period served to allow testing of its product and servers, flagging and ironing of glitches, and we presume collect some data on its initial user cohort.

During an opportunity to play around and wager on Friday and Saturday, we made some observations:

 


Those taking their first spin today will find a variety of props on baseball (below), and those throughout the country not yet able to check it out will eventually find the same options:

  • Total runs odd/even
  • Pre-made parlays, such as: “home team and over”
  • Team with the highest scoring inning
  • Last team to score
  • Team totals (runs scored)
  • Result of first inning (one or the other team will score or tie)

And the ability to bet on a wide variety of sports/events, including ATP-Rogers Cup, PGA Championship, Rugby Union, motorsports (Belgian GP), darts, cricket, and NCAA football futures, such as conference winner.

One not-yet-mentioned feature I like is that inputting bets both on mobile and desktop is pretty seamless: You put the bet in and hit “Place Bet.” You don’t have to re-enter your password or anything, which in the case of live-betting or halftime/quarter betting, can result in missing the window.

draftkings sportsbook review

The main drawback? The prices/juice is for the most part higher than at Las Vegas sportsbooks and offshores offer.

Critics have been loud on this front, but the reality is — there is a cost of doing business and playing in legal, regulated markets. DraftKings and the other legal NJ sportsbooks will have to pay 13 percent of gross revenues to the state of New Jersey.  And this is why Pennsylvania absolutely must reconsider the ludicrous fees ($10 million just to get a license) and taxes (36 percent) imposed by its sports betting legislation. 

Compared with zero percent in offshore markets. That money must come from somewhere. The Las Vegas books today mostly have 10, 15 or in some cases 20-cent money lines for baseball. On the DK sportsbook, they range between 15 and 30 cents.

Online Competition Coming

 

None of MGM, Caesars or William Hill is yet live with their mobile/web offerings in New Jersey. Expect those soon, as well as from the other NJ sportsbooks launching in retail soon, which is a priority for most.

How did DraftKings get to market first? They’ve been gunning for this opportunity for a while, and they also didn’t have to worry about the task of setting up retail operations. In NJ that task falls to Resorts Casino, whose license DraftKings is operating under.

On the technology and risk-management front, DraftKings has the Malta-headquarted Kambi Group providing risk-management and technology services behind the scenes.

Which brings to the target demographic: DraftKings is catering to the recreational bettor, probably many of whom haven’t used a sportsbook before and have only bet against a friend. People ticked off about inferior lines? They can play at the same places you have been. DraftKings offers certain conveniences such as simple debit card deposits and, depending where you’ve played, better consumer protections. 

When the local competition arrives for DraftKings, we could see their lines tighten. One of the interesting things we’ll have to watch going forward is how lines differ among the same operators in different jurisdictions. For example, what will Caesars be hanging in Las Vegas (6.75 percent tax rate) versus New Jersey (13 percent) versus a state that establishes, for example, a 10 percent rate? And then compare that with offshore.

Good luck outrunning higher juice, but this is the beauty of having choices.

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Meadowlands’ FanDuel Sportsbook Draws $3.5M Handle in Short Order

The post Meadowlands’ FanDuel Sportsbook Draws $3.5M Handle in Short Order appeared first on SportsHandle.

The FanDuel Sportsbook retail shop located at Meadowlands Racetrack in East Rutherford, New Jersey, yielded nearly $3.5 million in total wagers in just two weekends and one week since its July 14 opening, according to an Associated Press report. FanDuel officials confirmed the number to Sports Handle.

The New Jersey sportsbook’s opening marked a couple milestones, the first being the inaugural physical location for the DFS-focused operator FanDuel, its acquisition by Ireland-based bookmaker Paddy Power Betfair (PPB) now completed. A second FanDuel sportsbook is coming in August at the Greenbrier Resort in West Virginia.

The second big milestone was the launch of a sportsbook in an NFL team’s home state, better yet literally in its backyard. The Meadowlands Sports Complex is also home to MetLife Stadium, home field of the New York Giants, New York Jets and the Giants practice facility as well, the Quest Diagnostics Training Center. But the auspicious launch from a handle perspective did not escape without some controversy.

FanDuel Sportsbook at Meadowlands Boasts Happy Handle After Nine Days In Business, Bodes Well for Football Season.

 

The backlash stemmed from FanDuel Sportsbook’s opening day pricing. A number of the baseball games on the July 14 menu were offered at 35-cent lines, in the range of surprising and absurd. Industry standard, at least in Nevada, is about 15- or 10-cent lines on baseball. For example, -140 on the favorite and +130 on the underdog.

Per ESPN Chalk’s David Purdum two days after launch, “Bettors should expect more traditional pricing moving forward at the new FanDuel sportsbook at the Meadowlands, where over $1 million was wagered over the weekend.”

Not a good break out of the gate, but it will be forgotten by most come September when the book remains wonderfully situated just eight miles from Midtown Manhattan. By that time the mobile platform will be available, as well, with FanDuel’s built-in clientele set to be activated and other market players having to start from scratch.

Incidentally $3.5M is on par with the first month of sportsbook revenue (rather, 17 days) by the three then-operational NJ sportsbooks in June, which included the William Hill sportsbook at Monmouth Park and the Borgata Race & Sports Book in Atlantic City. Ocean Resort had its book open three days to end June. Keep in mind, the New Jersey sports betting revenue numbers will include future wagers and to-be-decided props at the time of the bets, with winning tickets to be deducted at the time of redemption.

Company Coming.

Last week the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement (DGE) accepted new sports wagering certificate applications from properties including Resorts Casinos, all Caesars Entertainment casinos (Harrah’s, Bally’s, Caesars) and the Golden Nugget.

The Harrah’s sportsbook is already under construction. Resorts, which has partnered with SB Tech and DraftKings, probably isn’t far behind. There may be as many as eight or nine sportsbooks live by football season and several of them with live mobile applications that will only increase handle and revenue.

It remains to be seen how much of that $3.5 million handle for Meadowlands falls into the “win” column, but it’s an auspicious start with a lesson learned during a period of relative calm, as far as the sports betting calendar goes.

On a Tour-de-Atlantic City sportsbooks and casino floors this past weekend, Sports Handle observed pretty full houses at Harrah’s, Tropicana, Borgata (the sportsbook and floor) and Ocean Resort. Likewise at the FanDuel Sportsbook on Sunday at noon, where more teller windows would have helped some deep lines.  

“I’m surprised how crowded it is here with the Hard Rock just opening,” a Harrah’s blackjack dealer said around 11 p.m. on Saturday night. “The Hard Rock looks nice. It is not the Taj Mahal [the space that Hard Rock now occupies].”

The Hard Rock Atlantic City is getting on the sports betting wagon, too, with some kind of partnership with the U.K.-based bet365 in the works.

A rising tide appears to be lifting all boats, with waves coming courtesy sports betting and some fresh starts.

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Another Wave of Casinos Apply to Join New Jersey Sports Betting Picture

The post Another Wave of Casinos Apply to Join New Jersey Sports Betting Picture appeared first on SportsHandle.
Wary of getting stuck on the sidelines for football season’s kickoff, five new applications arrived on Monday for a New Jersey sports betting license.
According to the Associated Press, the state’s Division of Gaming Enforcement (DGE) received two applications for brick-and-mortar licenses and three for mobile sports wagering before a Monday deadline. DGE Director David Rebuck previously announced a deadline in connection with football season to allow state regulators enough time to evaluate applications.
While the DGE did not identify the applicants, CDC Gaming Reports has learned that the applications came from Caesars Entertainment — to offer retail wagering at Harrah’s and Bally’s in Atlantic City. In addition, Ceasars applied for licensed to offer mobile sports wagering at all three of its Atlantic City properties, the other being Caesars Atlantic City, which would be “serviced” by the adjacent Bally’s. The other identified applicant is Golden Nugget, which applied for both retail and mobile wagering.
New Jersey Sports Betting Scene Set to Add Ceasars Entertainment Properties, Golden Nugget Atlantic City, All Looking to Get Up and Running Before Football Season
nj sportsbook at harrahs and other caesars properties for atlantic city new jersey sports betting
The remaining applicants likely came from a pool of Hard Rock Atlantic City (seeking to partner in some way with bet365), Tropicana, Resorts Casino or Freehold Raceway.
“I fully expect that by Aug. 1 we will see additional properties up and running,” Rebuck said.
The application fee for the sports wagering certificate is $100,000 and there’s a five-digit difference in tax rate on sports wagering revenue: revenue derived from in-person wagering is taxed by the state at 8.5 percent while mobile wagering faces a 13 percent tax.
We know a bit about the Golden Nugget’s sports betting plans. Shortly before the Supreme Court struck down the federal law allowing this sports betting land rush, Churchill Downs Incorporated and Golden Nugget Atlantic City announced a partnership to offer sports betting and online gaming markets.
Potential licensees yet to apply will not entirely miss the boat for the college football and NFL seasons: the DGE will just not make any promise to give a rubber stamp before kickoff or any week in particular.
So far in NJ sports betting, Monmouth Park and Ocean Resort Casino have sportsbooks up and running with operations managed by William Hill; also the Borgata, owned and operated by MGM, went live on June 14 like Monmouth Park. And this past Saturday, Meadowlands Racetrack in northern New Jersey cut a ribbon, introducing the first FanDuel Sportsbook.
[Also See: Odds Shift in Race for Operator Dominance in Legal U.S. Sports Betting Market]
Revenue for operators and the state so far has been pretty good. Through just 17 days of operations in June Monmouth and Borgata plus three days at Ocean, the total handle registered $16.4 million with a $3.5M win by the books (on a cash basis that counts futures wagers as revenue at the time of the wager), with $293,000 revenue yielded by the state. The FanDuel Sportsbook at Meadowlands, pricing controversy aside at its debut, saw over $1 million in wagers in its first weekend.
So far no facility has rolled out mobile wagering, but that is expected to happen in the coming days.
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Happy Anniversary! First Month of New Jersey Sports Betting In The Books

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Saturday will mark one month since New Jersey sports betting began in the Garden State, and the state has plenty of reason to celebrate the past month and look forward to the months and years ahead.
Governor Phil Murphy placed the state’s first official bet at Monmouth Park Sportsbook on June 14 as cameras clicked and a big crowd watched. Ninety minutes south, NBA legend Dr. J placed the first sports bet at the Borgata Race & Sportsbook in Atlantic City. Both venues claimed a first – Monmouth Park was the first New Jersey racetrack to accept a sports bet and the Borgata was the first New Jersey casino to do the same.
In the first month, there have been some key changes at Monmouth Park to accommodate the flow of sports bettors. The William Hill-run sportsbook had six teller windows at launch, which didn’t turn out to be enough: 15 additional windows have been added, in addition to 50 high-definition televisions, food carts, chairs and tables, in the grandstand area at the racetrack.
To Accommodate NJ Sports Betting Interest At Monmouth Park, The Facility Has Transformed the Grandstand
“That was a dead grandstand area,” said Tom Luicci, media manager for Monmouth Park. “If you’re facing the track, it’s on the far left side and now all of a sudden it’s probably the most vibrant area on the track. … It’s like a whole community that just sprung up out of a desert area.”
Luicci also said that the track has accommodated sports fans by opening its gates early — 8 a.m. vs. the traditional 11-11:30 a.m. opening times for horse racing — during the World Cup, so fans could place bets and watch games.
Similar scenes have likely been playing out at other venues. And there’s plenty of glory and goodwill – and money, it turns out, to be shared around the state.
“The initial sports wagering results illustrates the popularity among patrons and the potential of this new revenue stream for New Jersey operators,” said DGE Deputy Chief of financial investigations Christopher Glaum. “The Division anticipates continued revenue growth in future months as each of the state’s remaining 11 eligible sports wagering operators determines when and how they will seek to enter the marketplace.”

Maybe 14 Is New Jersey’s Lucky Number: PASPA Overturned May 14, NJ Sports Betting Opened June 14, and Meadowlands Will Take First Bets July on 14.

After nearly a decade of legal wrangling, New Jersey finally won the right for it – and every other state in the nation – to offer sports betting when the Supreme Court issued its decision on May 14, striking down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act in its Murphy v. NCAA decision.

Governor Phil Murphy placing the first legal sports wager in New Jersey at Monmouth Park.
Governor Phil Murphy placing the first legal sports wager in New Jersey at Monmouth Park.

The 14th has become an auspicious date for New Jersey since. It was on June 14 that Monmouth Park and the Borgata took those first sports bets, and it will be on July 14 that the Meadowlands, just over the border from New York City, will open for sports betting.
If the initial numbers are any indication, the Meadowlands should be in for some good business. The New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement released numbers from the first 17 days of sports betting at three locations (though the Ocean Resort didn’t open until June 28, so most of the money in the report flowed through Monmouth and the Borgata), they revealed a healthy interest in sports betting.
As in Delaware sports betting, New Jersey is using a cash method of accounting, not the accrual method used in Nevada. With that understanding, the sportsbooks generated in a collective $3,458,688 gross revenue, producing $293,863 in tax revenue for the state of New Jersey. That’s based on a total handle of $16.4 million from June 14-30.
The nearly $300,000 for New Jersey’s coffers is based on an 8.5 percent tax rate on operators’ sports wagering revenue. Considering that the state set the tax for mobile sports betting at 13 percent, it stands to bring in even more once mobile wagering is online, and certainly once more properties begin operations in the coming months. Those expected to do so include the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Atlantic City and the Golden Nugget.
Several properties are planning to debut mobile platforms later this summer and bettors in the state of New Jersey will be able to sign up for an account remotely.

Current New Jersey Sportsbooks are Bare Bones, But Operators Have Plans for More Posh Surroundings, Hopefully in Time for Football Season. 

As sports betting grows in New Jersey, so, too, will its sportsbooks. Monmouth Park, the Borgata and Ocean Resort all opened with what they called “temporary” sportsbooks. 
Essentially, there’s betting windows, odds boards and a few televisions in Spartan surroundings. The idea was to get up and running as soon as possible, and based on the numbers, all of the sportsbooks bet right – bettors were more interested in being able to place bets than needing the creature comforts of a Las Vegas-style sportsbook. But during the first month, and beyond, all three properties have continued work on more elaborate sportsbooks, and hope to have those open by the start of football season.
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Sports Betting Regulators, Officials Urge Patience– to Avoid Fumbling

The post Sports Betting Regulators, Officials Urge Patience– to Avoid Fumbling appeared first on SportsHandle.
Don’t rush! If there is one thing that regulators in states that have legal sports betting want to share, that’s it.
“I wouldn’t rush into this,” Delaware Lottery director Vernon Kirk said. “The world is still going to be there tomorrow. If you get started a little late, be thorough, talk to people who have experience with this and just be careful in your legislation and execution.”
On June 5, Delaware became the first state since the Supreme Court struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA) to offer legal sports betting. Delaware had company upon the debut of New Jersey sports betting on June 14, while Mississippi, Pennsylvania and West Virginia are currently developing regulations, accepting applications and preparing with licensees to begin accepting wagers in the next few months.
DE, PA and NJ Sports Betting Officials Agree: Rolling out Sports Betting Regulations Requires Patience, and States Want to Get It Right the First Time.
Delaware was particularly quick in debuting full-fledged wagering at its licensed properties, but the same facilities already were experienced in offering NFL parlay wagering in years passed, plus it had many of its rules, regulations and technology in place after attempting to offer full-fledged sports betting in 2009. One month in, things are going smoothly.
Other states may not have the luxury of past experience, or the ability to be as nimble as Delaware, the second smallest state by population in the nation.

rhode island sports betting governor raimondo expecting 24 million
Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo (L) with R.I. House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello.

But every state regulating body is likely feeling at least a little bit of pressure. Some lawmakers across the country have been touting sports betting as a windfall for their state budgets. In fact, Rhode Island governor Gina Raimondo earmarked $23.5 million in sports betting revenue in her latest budget. Rhode Island made sports betting legal in late June.
To help get there, the state is taking 51 percent of all sports wagering revenue — by far the largest cut in the country. The state will still need to generate an awful lot of wagering and will not be allowing mobile betting off premises, either.
New Jersey will celebrate its first month anniversary of legal sports betting on July 14, which coincides with the first day that The Meadowlands will accept sports wagers. Currently, licensed sportsbooks are operating in three locations in New Jersey.
The Garden State was the driver of Murphy v NCAA, the case that escalated to the Supreme Court and resulted in the high court ruling PASPA unconstitutional. Monmouth Park, a key driver in the lawsuit, was the first to open for business.
“We are pleased with the rollout of sports wagering in New Jersey,” said David L. Rebuck, director of the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement. “While actual wagering only started in June, the Division was preparing for this possibility well in advance. My advice for other jurisdictions would be to have good communication with the industry and look to strong regulatory models such as New Jersey as you move forward.”

‘Don’t Let Your Legislators Go Crazy and Make Ridiculous Projections,’ Warned Delaware Lottery Directory Vernon Kirk. 


In Pennsylvania, which passed its enabling legislation in 2017, the state gaming commission is in the process of rolling out regulations to get started. And just as in any other state, regulators know the whole endeavor is driven by money.
“We understand that the expansion of gambling in Pennsylvania is being undertaken to raise more money for the commonwealth,” said Doug Harbach, Director of Communications for the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board. “We’re trying to get a potentially lucrative market up and running as soon as possible, but we want to make sure it has all of the necessary regulations to protect the public.”
Harbach’s sentiment was also echoed by Kirk in Delaware and down south, by Allen Godfrey, executive director of the Mississippi Gaming Commission.
“The one thing I would say is to tamp down expectations,” Kirk said. “We’re doing really well, but don’t let your legislators go crazy and make ridiculous projections and saddle you with unrealistic expectations.”
Said Godfrey: “The numbers out there are so out of whack, I wouldn’t want to quote them,” Godfrey said of lawmakers’ pie-in-the-sky expectations. “Anything we get will be more than we’re getting now.”

Mississippi, Pennsylvania and West Virginia Are Aiming to Take First Legal Sports Bets During or Even Before, Football Season.

In Mississippi, sports betting regulations will go into effect on July 21. The state’s gaming commission has already received at least a handful of applications from potential operators and it appears that every commercial casino in the state will offer sports betting. The gaming commission, which has been overseeing the state’s 28 casinos for more than 25 years, moved swiftly to put out its regulations.
In West Virginia, the goal, according to West Virginia Lottery general counsel Danielle Boyd, is for the Mountaineer State to accept its first sports bet by football season, but no later than Sept. 1. West Virginia has five casinos. The state will roll out regulations under “emergency status.”

wv sports betting plans and procedures
The West Virginia Lottery Building.

“It’s a different animal than anything that we’ve dealt with before and so knowing that, we’ve tried to surround ourselves with the best and the brightest consultants,” Boyd told Sports Handle in June. “One of the challenges has been making sure that we have the legislative rules we need, but avoiding ones we don’t. So we’ll need some flexibility.”
“We do have ’emergency status’ until early December as far as these legislative rules are concerned. So we can change them, we can add to them if we need to until December, but after that point, they would have to go through the legislative rule making process.”
Back in Pennsylvania, Harbach says the goal is slow and steady.

Focus of PA Sports Betting Regulations Is to Protect the Public.

“We know our chief role is to protect the public,” he said. “So we’re going to make sure we have it right. We’re not rushing anything.”
Pennsylvania lawmakers made sports betting legal in 2017 pending the status of PASPA. Since the Supreme Court decision came down, state regulators have rolled out draft regulations for sports betting and opened them to public comment. Those comments — from the professional sports leagues, Penn State University, Pitt and potential gaming operators — are under review. But the comment period is an example of why regulators can’t rush — it takes time to hear from stakeholders and then open conversations based on concerns.
Harbach thinks his group, similar to Delaware, has a bit of a leg up on other states. In the recent past, the gaming commission has had to develop regulations for fantasy sports and iGaming, among other issues, making sports betting legal a sixth new set of regulations to develop, he said.
Whether it’s sports betting or iGaming, Pennsylvania regulators would rather get it right the first time.
“The potential for revenue will be there when we are ready,” Harbach said. “We’re not feeling the pressure from the legislators. They understand that we need to get it right. There are some who see it as being beneficial as being ready before the football season, but we are not [aiming] for a particular sports season.”
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William Hill Opens New Jersey’s First Sports Book

The Supreme Court’s decision to allow states to handle sports betting opened the floodgates for established companies to expand their reach in the American market. One of the first is William Hill, a long running book based out of the UK. The company brings in over 2 billion in annual revenue and that number will only increase with American books outside of the 107 the company already runs in Nevada. You can read the whole press release below:

OCEANPORT, N.J. – Thursday, June 14, 2018 — William Hill, America’s leading sports book operator, today accepted New Jersey’s first legal sports wagers, officially opening its sports book at Monmouth Park Racetrack.

The historic moment was marked by the placing of the ceremonial first bets by Governor Phil MurphyGovernor Murphy’s historic wagers were a $20 futures bet, placed at 7/2 odds, on Germany to win the 2018 World Cup and a $20 futures bet, placed at 40/1 odds, on the New Jersey Devils to win the 2018-19 Stanley Cup. Governor Murphy was joined onsite by State Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin, former State Senator Raymond Lesniak, Dennis Drazin, Chairman and CEO of Darby Development, operator of Monmouth Park, and William Hill US CEO Joe Asher.

“We are excited to open for business at Monmouth Park,” said Joe Asher, CEO of William Hill US, America’s largest sports book operator. “Obviously, it’s a big day for us. A lot of people have worked really hard for a long time to make today possible and I am grateful for their efforts.”

Now open, the Monmouth Park Sports Book by William Hill offers a diverse sports betting menu that includes football, basketball, baseball, hockey, soccer, tennis, and more.  The complex features a 15-window main sports book, and an integrated sports bar, with over 40 HDTVs showing live sporting events and dynamic betting lines. The sports book is open seven days a week.

Customers visiting the Monmouth Park Sports Book by William Hill have 29 different ways to bet the 2018 World Cup opening game between Russia and Saudi Arabia (kickoff at 11AM ET) – the earliest sporting event available on today’s menu.